NSAIDs


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NSAIDs

Abbreviation for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs , under drug; for example, aspirin, ibuprofen.

NSAIDs

Abbrev. for NON-STEROIDAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUGS.

NSAIDs

This abbreviation stands for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which are medications such as Ibufprofen that are used to control pain and inflammation. Most may be purchased over the counter. One of their major side effects is that they decrease the effect of the normal blood clotting factors in blood. In patients undergoing surgical or endoscopic procedures, this can lead to an increased risk of bleeding.

non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

; NSAIDs group of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs that include aspirin, propionic acid derivatives (e.g. ibuprofen, fenbrufen, ketoprofen) and similar drugs (e.g. diclofenac, difusinal, etodolac, indometacin, meloxicam, prioxicam, sulindac, ketorolac and mefenamic acid); action: NSAIDs suppress inflammation and pain by inhibiting the cyclooxygenase pathway and preventing release of inflammatory mediators (e.g. prostacyclins, prostaglandins and thromboxanes); used to control acute inflammation and pain (e.g. soft-tissue or bone injury), chronic inflammation (e.g. associated with osteo- or rheumatoid arthritis); side-effects of long-term use include reduced healing, compromised immunity, increased susceptibility to infections, epidermal atrophy (thinning of skin), peripheral oedema, bruising and bleeding tendency (i.e. antiplatelet effect), gastric irritation and/or ulceration, tinnitus and anaemia (secondary to gastrointestinal bleeding) (Table 1); NSAIDs are contraindicated in ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease and heart failure; patients with angina or ischaemic heart disease, or those at risk of cerebrovascular accident (stroke) are advised to take 75mg aspirin daily; NSAIDs alone may be inadequate to control postoperative pain (see Table 2)
Table 1: The range of side-effects of long-term non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drug (NSAID) medication
SystemEffect
GastrointestinalNausea; dyspepsia; diarrhoea; peptic ulceration or perforation; bleeding
RenalFluid retention; peripheral oedema; renal failure; papillary necrosis; interstitial fibrosis
RespiratoryBronchoconstriction; pulmonary eosinophilia; alveolitis
CoagulationReduced platelet aggregation; increased bleeding time; easy bruising
SkinSevere allergic reactions (e.g. Stevens-Johnson syndrome); toxic epidermal necrolysis; angioedema; skin thinning; reduced healing
VisceralCongestive heart failure; hepatitis; pancreatitis; aseptic meningitis
Table 2: The range of side-effects of long-term non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drug (NSAID) medication
SystemEffect
GastrointestinalNausea; dyspepsia; diarrhoea; peptic ulceration or perforation; bleeding
RenalFluid retention; peripheral oedema; renal failure; papillary necrosis; interstitial fibrosis
RespiratoryBronchoconstriction; pulmonary eosinophilia; alveolitis
CoagulationReduced platelet aggregation; increased bleeding time; easy bruising
SkinSevere allergic reactions (e.g. Stevens-Johnson syndrome); toxic epidermal necrolysis; angioedema; skin thinning; reduced healing
VisceralCongestive heart failure; hepatitis; pancreatitis; aseptic meningitis

NSAIDs

Abbreviation for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.

NSAIDs,

n.pl the acronym for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. See also naproxen.

NSAIDs

Patient discussion about NSAIDs

Q. Is there any good source for heel pain relief, besides NSAIDs? My heel pain is most severe at night when I sleep. It's as if the way I position my feet worsen the condition, but I'm at a loss to know how to position my feet. During the day my heels feel so but don't typically bother me.

A. I have found that keeping my feet flexed (the position they are in when standing) helps ease the pain of plantar facitis. I also don't let my feet get cold(wear socks)and keep heavy blankets and quilts off the feet. Placing a box under the covers at the foot of the bed will help keep the blankets up. Do try the exercises recommended on the above web sites. It usually resolves in about 6 months. Best wishes!

More discussions about NSAIDs
References in periodicals archive ?
Their risk of colorectal cancer was 43% lower than in people who weren't taking regular NSAIDs.
Now that we have added a low dose meloxicam product to our growing franchise, we can extend our reach to offer an additional formulation of one of the most commonly used NSAIDs for those affected by osteoarthritis pain,[sup.
The update to NSAID labels follows the recommendations given by panel members from a joint meeting of the FDA's Arthritis Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee in February 2014 in which there was a split vote (14-11) that was slightly in favor of rewording the warning labeling for NSAIDs in regard to the drug class's current labeling, which implies that the cardiovascular thrombotic risk is not substantial with short treatment courses.
In a July 9 drug safety communication, the agency did not provide the exact language that will be used on NSAID labels, but said that they "will be revised to reflect" information describing that:
The most common NSAIDs prescribed were Ibuprofen (23 percent) and Diclofenac (13.
These cases, including some in which patients' kidney function will need to be monitored for years, as well as the cost of treatment, are quite significant, especially when you consider that alternatives are available and acute kidney injury from NSAIDs is avoidable," Dr.
Compared with people who didn't get NSAIDs via prescription, those who did were 63 percent more likely to die over the next five years and 41 percent more likely to die specifically of a heart problem or to have another heart attack.
The research found that women who took any type, and any dose, of NSAID had a 2.
The most common NSAIDs given on prescription were ibuprofen and diclofenac.
The decrease in the inflammatory response to NSAIDs may be beneficial but may also cause harm.
Nevertheless, it ruled that the "overall benefit-risk balance for non-selective NSAIDs remains favourable" when the patient's history was taken into account and packet instructions were followed.
received NSAIDs any time during the 2 weeks before the diagnosis of invasive GAS infection nor the finding that non-hospitalized children (controls) were unlikely to have received NSAIDs in the 2 weeks before their interview should be surprising.