NPDB


Also found in: Acronyms.

National Practitioner Data Bank

 (NPDB)
a computerized information system that contains a record of malpractice claims, privileges actions, and other disciplinary actions. It was created to ensure that incompetent health care professionals do not move from one state to another.

NPDB

National Practitioner Data Bank.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Harnam Singh, branch chief of research for the United States Healthcare Resources and Services Association (HRSA), even with a formal uncontested report to the NPDB, more than 87 percent of these physicians successfully resumed their professional careers.
From 1998 through 2003, the NPDB collected and recorded data on more than 91,000 paid malpractice claims from across the nation and from all healthcare venues.
Physicians and other practitioners listed in the data banks can query about themselves only; if they query the NPDB, HHS automatically also initiates a query to the HIPDB; the charge to the provider is $20 ($10 per query).
If the information in the NPDB Public Use File (PUF) is compared with information in publicly available documents, such as court documents, then the information in the databank can be linked to a specific physician.
The need for the creation of the NPDB stemmed, in large part, from problematic self-regulation by the medical profession.
A "standard of care not met" determination and attribution of responsibility in these cases may result in a report to the Defense Practitioner Data Bank rather than the NPDB.
Obviously, this date as well as others was long before the creation of the NPDB.
There were no reasons given for the investigation, which led to the report to the NPDB.
9 percent (2,520 of 2,655) of practitioners with an adverse NPDB finding had one or more malpractice payment reports; 9 percent (n=240) of practitioners with one or more NPDB reports did not disclose on their credentials application the adverse finding(s) reported by NPDB.
The NPDB can be accessed by a number of organizations, including potential future employers and accreditation committees.
The Health Care Quality Improvement Act's reporting requirements and the potential availability, real and perceived, of the information contained in the NPDB generated legitimate concern among healthcare entities and professionals nationwide.