NIH Stroke Scale

NIH Stroke Scale

Neurology A somewhat cumbersome system for stratifying stroke victims who are candidates for thrombolytics Parameters measured Level of consciousness, orientation, ability to obey simple commands, ability to visually trace an object, visual field, facial palsy, motor strength of all 4 extremities, coordination, language, speech clarity. See Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale, Stroke, Thrombolytics.
References in periodicals archive ?
The clinical outcome following stroke was assessed using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and the NIH stroke scale (NIHSS); the former reflecting disability in terms of daily living and the latter neurological deficit.
Based on the NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) a tool from the National Institutes of Health used by healthcare providers to objectively quantify the impairment caused by a stroke, the patient had a score of 7 on the 0-44 scale (0 is best, 44 is most severe).
All data were independently monitored, all adverse events related to primary endpoints were adjudicated by an independent Clinical Events Committee (CEC) consisting of experienced cardiac surgeons and interventional cardiologists, and all cerebrovascular events (including stroke and other events) were adjudicated by an independent neurologist using neuroimaging and systematic NIH Stroke Scale assessments.
Keywords: Canadian Neurological Scale, Four Score, Glasgow Coma Scale, neurologic assessment, NIH Stroke Scale
From our Staff Educators e-mail: "Hello All; We are aware of the difficulties in accessing the NIH stroke scale program.
3A and 3B have huge differences in their ordinate scales, with none of the results for IschSt cases reaching the value of 1; however, 14 of the 37 ICH patients also had values <1, despite an increasing value for the group as a function of NIH Stroke Scale (and inferred increased volume).
At the end of the study, the NIH stroke scale was identical in the two groups.
The study enrolled 150 ischemic stroke patients with signs of cortical involvement and NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 7-20.
Lack of improvement was defined as a difference of 3 points or less between the NIH Stroke Scale score at baseline and at 24 hours.
The primary outcome measure will be neurologic function according to the NIH Stroke Scale, from admission to week 3; secondary outcome measures will be length of hospital stay, neurologic deficits at 4 and 8 weeks, and mortality.
A total of 77 patients at 15 centers met study criteria which required that patients show evidence of large vessel occlusion within 8 hours of symptom onset and a NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score 10.
Baseline NIH Stroke Scale score strongly predicts outcome after stroke: A report of the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST).