NID


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NID

abbreviation for National Institute for the Deaf.

dysplasia

(dis-pla'zh(e-)a) [ dys- + -plasia]
Abnormal development of tissue. Synonym: alloplasia; heteroplasia

anal dysplasia

Anal intraepithelial neoplasia.

anhidrotic dysplasia

A congenital condition marked by absent or deficient sweat glands, intolerance of heat, and abnormal development of teeth and nails.

arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia

Abbreviation: ARVD
A rare degenerative disease of desmosomes within heart muscle that may produce life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. It is a cause of sudden death or ventricular tachycardia in athletes. The dysplasia is diagnosed by a combination of tests (specific angiographic, electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, MRI, and biopsy or necropsy criteria). Some forms of the disease are autosomal dominantly inherited. Synonym: arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy; arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy

bronchopulmonary dysplasia

The need for supplemental oxygen in an infant born prematurely, esp. when that need is present after 36 weeks' gestation. Synonym: chronic lung disease of the newborn

Patient care

A team approach is necessary to provide optimal inpatient and outpatient care to infants and their families. Educating the family about the disease, its treatment, and its prognosis are critical to providing optimal care to affected infants. Inpatient care emphasizes respiratory support for the infant, appropriate nutrition to support growth and development, and regular physical contact with parents to encourage bonding esp. during long, and emotionally taxing hospital stays. Enrolling the family in a follow-up program with supportive care for the infant is important to help the parents in the early months after hospital discharge. Educating the family about continuing care about follow-up appointments and therapies is essential. The care team addresses the nutritional, developmental, general medical and social services each infant and family need to promote optimal long-term development of the infant.

cervical dysplasia

Precancerous changes in the cells of the uterine cervix, typically obtained for cytological examination by brushing or scraping cells from the cervix during a Pap test or colposcopy. Changes found on the Papanicolaou test (Pap test) are called a squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL) and are classified as low grade (LSIL), high grade (HSIL), or possibly malignant. When a biopsy of the cervix is performed, the dysplasia is called a cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and is classified as CIN I-mild, CIN II-moderate, and CIN III-severe to carcinoma in situ.

chondroectodermal dysplasia

Ellis–van Creveld syndrome .

developmental dysplasia of the hip

Congenital dislocation of the hip.

ectodermal dysplasia

Any of a group of rare inherited disorders in which there are defects in the function or development of glands, hair, nails, or teeth, i.e., organs that originate embryologically in the ectoderm.

fibromuscular dysplasia

A dysplasia of the fibrous and muscular walls of an artery, resulting in impaired blood flow or stenosis. It is most often found in the renal arteries, esp. in young women as a cause of hypertension, or in the carotid arteries of adults.

fibrous dysplasia

A rare, nonheritable congenital bone disease characterized by disorganized alignment of collagen within bone and weak bone formation. Symptoms include bone pain, bone deformities, fractures, and neurological deficits. Some patients are also affected by endocrine disorders, such as diabetes mellitus, acromegaly, or hyperprolactinemia. There are two forms of the disease: monostotic fibrous dysplasia is a variant of the disease in which a single bony lesion is found; in polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, lesions are found in multiple bones, including long bones, facial and cranial bones, or other locations.

hereditary ectodermal dysplasia

A form of anhidrotic dysplasia marked by few or absent sweat glands and hair follicles, smooth shiny skin, abnormal or absent teeth, nail deformities, cataracts or corneal alterations, absence of mammary glands, a concave face, prominent eyebrows, conjunctivitis, deficient hair growth, and mental retardation.

Kniest dysplasia

See: Kniest dysplasia

McCusick metaphyseal dysplasia

See: McCusick metaphyseal dysplasia

monostotic fibrous dysplasia

Fibrous dysplasia that affects a single bone.

neuronal intestinal dysplasia

Abbreviation: NID
A disorder of bowel motility in which the innervation of the intestines is ectopic (the ganglions that provide nervous control of intestinal musculature being misplaced).

oculoauricular vertebral dysplasia

Hemifacial microsomia.

osteofibrous dysplasia

An extremely rare, benign bone tumor occurring in children under 10. The primary symptoms are painless swelling or bowing of bone. It usually develops in the tibia or fibula.

periapical cemento-osseous dysplasia

A benign, asymptomatic fibro-osseous lesion that develops at the apex of the anterior mandibular teeth. No treatment is necessary.

polyostotic fibrous dysplasia

Fibrous dysplasia affecting multiple bones, including, in some children, long bones as well as facial or cranial bones. See: McCune-Albright syndrome

septo-optic dysplasia

A rare developmental disorder of the brain and eye in which the optic disk and septum pellucidum do not develop normally, resulting in blindness, hormonal deficiencies, learning disabilities, decreased muscular tone, and, occasionally, seizures.
Synonym: Morsier syndrome

thanatophoric dysplasia

Abbreviation: TD
An often lethal form of osteochondrodysplasia in which abnormalities of bone and cartilage development are accompanied by underdevelopment of the lungs. It is detectable in utero with prenatal ultrasound.

neuronal intestinal dysplasia

Abbreviation: NID
A disorder of bowel motility in which the innervation of the intestines is ectopic (the ganglions that provide nervous control of intestinal musculature being misplaced).
See also: dysplasia
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Michael Goldberg, a pediatrician on the clinical teaching staff of UCLA and President of the NIDS Research Institute, an international panel of medical experts studying immune and brain function in children with autism and other neuro-cognitive dysfunctions.
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