NALP3 inflammasome

NALP3 inflammasome

A well-characterised inflammasome (a multiprotein cytoplasmic complex which activates one or more caspases, leading to the processing and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines—e.g., IL-1 beta, IL-18 and IL-33) composed of NALP3, ASC, pro-caspase-1, and Cardinal. Assembly of inflammasomes depends on the NOD-like receptor family members, such as the NALP proteins.
References in periodicals archive ?
Innate immune activation through Nalp3 inflammasome sensing of asbestos and silica.
Autophagy proteins regulate innate immune responses by inhibiting the release of mitochondrial DNA mediated by the NALP3 inflammasome.
The production of proinflammatory cytokines required two signalling pathways to be active, one initiated by the protein Tlr9 and one activated by a protein complex known as the Nalp3 inflammasome.
Activation of the NALP3 inflammasome is triggered by low intracellular potassium concentration.
Sodium overload and water influx activate the NALP3 inflammasome.
The response of tissue macrophages to crystals involves the activation of the NALP3 inflammasome, a multimolecular complex that employs the enzyme caspase 1 to convert the pro-form of IL-1[beta] into the active form (Fig.
While controversy exists as to whether or not uric acid activates NALP3 via Toll-like receptors (specifically, TLR2 and 4), it appears that MyD88, the molecule that transmits TLR signals intracellularly, plays an important role in both activating the NALP3 inflammasome and in signaling a secondary autohumoral response to secreted IL-1 (Fig.