Mycoplasma


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Related to Mycoplasma: Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Ureaplasma

Mycoplasma

 [mi´ko-plaz″mah]
a genus of highly pleomorphic, gram-negative, aerobic or facultatively anaerobic bacteria that lack cell walls, including the pleuropneumonia-like organisms and other species.
Mycoplasma ho´minis a species found associated with nongonococcal urethritis and mild pharyngitis.
Mycoplasma pneumo´niae a cause of primary atypical pneumonia; called also Eaton agent.

Mycoplasma

(mī'kō-plaz'mă),
A genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Mycoplasmataceae) containing gram-negative cells that do not possess a true cell wall but are bounded by a three-layered membrane; they do not revert to bacteria-containing cell walls or cell wall fragments. The minimal reproductive units of these organisms are 0.2-0.3 mcm in diameter. The cells are pleomorphic, and in liquid media appear as coccoid bodies, rings, or filaments. Colonies of most species consist of a central core, growing down into the medium, surrounded by superficial peripheral growth. They require sterol for growth. They also require enrichment with serum or ascitic fluid. These organisms are found in humans and other animals and can be pathogenic. The type species is Mycoplasma mycoides.
Synonym(s): Asterococcus
[myco- + G. plasma, something formed (plasm)]

my·co·plas·ma

, pl.

my·co·plas·ma·ta

(mī'kō-plaz'mă, -plaz'mah-tă),
A vernacular term used only to refer to any member of the genus Mycoplasma.

Mycoplasma

/My·co·plas·ma/ (mi´ko-plaz″mah) a genus of pleomorphic, gram-negative, aerobic to facultatively anerobic bacteria lacking cell walls, including the pleuropneumonia-like organisms; species include M. ho´minis, which is associated with nongonococcal urethritis and mild pharyngitis, and M. pneumo´niae, a cause of primary atypical pneumonia.

mycoplasma

(mī′kō-plăz′mə)
n.
Any of various extremely small bacteria of the genus Mycoplasma that lack cell walls, are usually nonmotile, and are often pathogenic or parasitic in mammals.

my′co·plas′mal adj.

Mycoplasma

[mī′kōplaz′mə]
Etymology: Gk, mykes + plassein, to mold
a genus of ultramicroscopic organisms lacking rigid cell walls and considered to be the smallest free-living organisms. Some are saprophytes, some are parasites, and many are pathogens. One species is a cause of mycoplasma pneumonia, tracheobronchitis, pharyngitis, and bullous myringitis. See also pleuropneumonia-like organism.
enlarge picture
Colonies of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

Mycoplasma

A genus of incomplete intracellular and extracellular pathogens of class Mollicutes, which cause walking pneumonia that resolves in 4–6 weeks and genitourinary infections. M hominis may cause pelvic inflammatory disease, septicaemia and urogenital infection.
 
Microbiology
Mycoplasma measure 0.25 µm, lack cell wall precursors (N-acetyl glucosamine and N-acetylmuramic acid), divide by binary fusion and fragmentation, and have CO2 and NH3 as end products of ureaplasma enzymatic hydrolysis. The growth medium requires fresh yeast or fatty acids, sterols and nucleic acids; the spherule seen on culture represents a microcolony and has a fried egg appearance. M pneumoniae produces hydrogen peroxide, may be identified by hemadsorption and CF, and infects epithelial cells without producing leukocytosis.
 
Diagnosis
Based on a a single titre of > 1:256, or a 4-fold increased in titer when ≥ 2 specimens have been obtained from the patient on different occasions.

Mycoplasma

Infectious disease A pathogen that causes 'walking pneumonia'–resolving in 4-6 wks, and genitourinary infections. M hominis may cause PID, septicemia, urogenital infection

My·co·plas·ma

(mī'kō-plaz'mă)
A genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria containing gram-negative cells that do not possess a true cell wall but are bounded by a three-layered membrane. The cells are pleomorphic and, in liquid media, appear as coccoid bodies, rings, or filaments. These organisms are found in humans and other animals and are parasitic to pathogenic.
[myco- + G. plasma, something formed (plasm)]

my·co·plas·ma

, pl. mycoplasmata (mī'kō-plaz-mă, -plaz'mă-tă)
A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the genus Mycoplasma.

Mycoplasma

A genus of very small micro-organisms, about the size of some viruses but capable of independent existence. Unlike bacteria they have no cell walls. Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes outbreaks of PNEUMONIA in institutions. Mycoplasma hominis , is often present harmlessly in the mouth or vagina but is believed to be a cause of URETHRITIS and SALPINGITIS. Mycoplasma infections respond to TETRACYCLINE and ERYTHROMYCIN.

Mycoplasma

A type of free-living microorganism that has no cell wall. Mycoplasmas cause some varieties of pneumonia and urinary tract infections that stimulate the body to produce cold agglutinins.
Mentioned in: Cold Agglutinins Test

Mycoplasma

genus of Gram-positive bacteria; lack a true cell wall

My·co·plas·ma

(mī'kō-plaz'mă)
A genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria found in humans and other animals; range from parasitic to pathogenic.
[myco- + G. plasma, something formed (plasm)]

Mycoplasma,

n a genus of ultramicroscopic organisms lacking rigid cell walls and considered to be the smallest free-living organisms.

Mycoplasma

a genus of highly pleomorphic, aerobic or facultatively anaerobic bacteria that lack cell walls, including the pleuropneumonia-like organisms (PPLO).

Mycoplasma agalactiae, Mycoplasma capricolum, Mycoplasma conjunctivae, Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides and subsp. capri, Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, Mycoplasma putrefaciens, Mycoplasma strain F-38
cause disease in sheep and goats. See contagious agalactia, contagious caprine/ovine pleuropneumonia, enzootic pneumonia, keratoconjunctivitis, mycoplasmal polyarthritis and Table 16.
Mycoplasma alkalescens, Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma bovoculi, Mycoplasma bovigenitalium, Mycoplasma bovirhinis Mycoplasma californicum, Mycoplasma canadense, Mycoplasma dispar and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides
found in cattle and may cause disease, including pneumonia, mastitis, arthritis, ocular infection and mastitis. See contagious bovine pleuropneumonia, enzootic pneumonia, keratoconjunctivitis and Table 16.
Mycoplasma anatis, Mycoplasma gallinarum, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma gallopavonis, Mycoplasma iowae, Mycoplasma meleagridis, Mycoplasma synoviae
cause disease in poultry. See chronic respiratory disease, infectious avian synovitis, infectious sinusitis of turkeys, and turkey syndrome.
Mycoplasma arthritidis, Mycoplasma neurolyticum, Mycoplasma pulmonis
cause disease in rats and mice. See murine respiratory mycoplasmosis, rolling disease.
Mycoplasma columbinasale, Mycoplasma columborale
found in pigeons, but pathogenicity is not known.
Mycoplasma cynos, Mycoplasma gateae, Mycoplasma spumans
found in dogs and cats and may be associated with disease. See also histiocytic ulcerative colitis, kennel cough.
Mycoplasma felis
found in the respiratory tract of horses and may cause pleuritis. It causes conjunctivitis in cats.
Mycoplasma flocculare, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae
cause disease in pigs. See atrophic rhinitis, mycoplasma arthritis and enzootic pneumonia.
Mycoplasma haematoparvum
a hemophilic species of uncertain clinical significance found in dogs.
Mycoplasma haemocanis
a hemophilic species found in dogs that is usually apathogenic, but can cause anemia in spelenctomized dogs. Previously called Haemobartonella canis.
Mycoplasma haemofelis
a hemophilic species that causes feline infectious anemia. Previously called Haemobartonella felis.
Mycoplasma haemominutum
a hemophilic species of uncertain clinical significance found in cats.
Mycoplasma haemomuris
a hemophilic species found in rats that is transmitted by lice and is usually apathogenic, but can cause fatal anemia in splenectomized or immunosuppressed animals.
Mycoplasma ovis
a hemophilic species that can cause anemia and ill thrift in weaner sheep, although infection is often inapparent. Previously called Eperythrozoon ovis.
Mycoplasma suis
a hemophilic species that causes anemia and jaundice in piglets. Can cause high mortalities. Previously called Eperythrozoon suis.
Mycoplasma wenyonii
a hemophilic species that may occasionally cause fever and anemia, but is usually apathogenic. Previously called Eperythrozoon wenyonii.

mycoplasma

microorganisms in the class Mollicutes; the genera of importance in animals are Mycoplasma, Ureaplasma and Acholeplasma.

t-strain mycoplasma
ureaplasmaurealyticum.
References in periodicals archive ?
More complications occur in macrolide-resistant than in macrolidesensitive Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia.
Besides these new services, ABR offers mycoplasma testing to satisfy USDA 9CFR regulations and also provides an extensive list of other testing services for viruses and bacteria.
Pathogenesis of extrapulmonary manifestations of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection with special reference to pneumonia.
Association of genital mycoplasmas including Mycoplasma genitalium in HIV infected men with nongonococcal urethritis attending STD and HIV clinics.
Borrelia and Mycoplasma are just two pathogens that can be transmitted by ticks.
Since Mycoplasma species do not grow in Mueller-Hinton broth, pleuropneumonia-like organism basal medium (PPLO) (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, USA) with added foetal calf serum and yeast extract was prepared according to the method of Hayflick (Hayflick, 1965; Thiaucourt and Di-Maria, 1992).
She had isolated many times and over many years a highly pleomorphic, gram variable Mycoplasma from the blood and tumours of Rous virus infected chickens and from other sources of the virus.
Key Words: Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Stevens Johnson syndrome, atypical pneumonia, erythema multiforme
The MTC-NI assay, developed by GenProbe, is a DNA probe-based screening tool used in the broad detection of mycoplasma and other organisms.
Key Words: Mycoplasma pneumoniae, hemolytic anemia, cold agglutinins, arterial thrombosis, pneumonia
To get the rotor to rotate, the scientists use a strain of bacteria called Mycoplasma mobile, which move quickly--for bacteria.