mutualism

(redirected from Mutualisms)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Mutualisms: Symbiotic Relationships

mutualism

 [mu´choo͡-al-izm]
the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species, both of which are benefited by the relationship and sometimes unable to exist without it. adj., adj mutualis´-tic.

mu·tu·al·ism

(myū'chū-ăl-izm),
Symbiotic relationship in which both species derive benefit. Compare: commensalism, metabiosis, parasitism.

mutualism

/mu·tu·al·ism/ (mu´choo-al-izm″) the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species, both of which are benefited by the relationship and sometimes unable to exist without it.

mutualism

(myo͞o′cho͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
An association between two organisms of different species in which each member benefits.

mu′tu·al·ist n.
mu′tu·al·is′tic adj.

mu·tu·al·ism

(myū'chyū-ăl-izm)
Symbiotic relationship from which both species derive benefit.
Compare: commensalism, metabiosis, parasitism

mutualism

see SYMBIOSIS.

mutualism

the biological association of two animals or populations of different species, both of which are benefited by the relationship and sometimes unable to exist without it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Optimal defence theory predicts investment in extrafloral nectar resources in an ant-plant mutualism.
Resource competition and mutualism exploited by invasive species can play a role in the disintegration of original ecosystems (Traveset and Richardson, 2006).
A growing body of research is showing that mutualism complements competition and is utterly fundamental to life on earth (Margulis, Symbiotic Planet).
Trees aLso can benefit from the voracious appetites of ground-dwelling predatory ants--another indirect mutualism between trees and ants.
The availability of host sequences offers new opportunities to assess impacts of long-term mutualisms on animal genomes.
They also found weather a mutualism survives can depend upon the density and distribution of other species in the community.
Whilst Goodwin (1992) indicated a negative role of fungal mutualisms in maximizing fitness of invasive species, Bever et al.
The occurrence and abundance of plants with extrafloral nectaries, the basis for antiherbivore defensive mutualisms, along a latitudinal gradient in east Asia.
Browne and others like him, from whatever perspective, recognize the importance of true mutualism for corporations and society.
Specialization for this mutualism involves plants producing small seeds that have a fat-rich aril (elaiosome).
Bacteria, Bradyrhizobium, coevolution, electrophoresis, geographic variation, legumes, mutualism, plant-microbe interaction, symbiosis.
Molecular approaches are making the cellular and genetic basis for bacterial mutualisms with marine animals accessible to detailed study for the first time.