genetic load

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Related to Mutational load: Genetic burden

ge·net·ic load

the aggregate of more or less harmful genes that are carried, mostly hidden, in the genome that may be transmitted to descendants and cause morbidity and disease; in classic genetic dynamics, genetic load may be seen as undischarged genetic debts that result from previous mutations, each of which is supposed to exact an average number of lethal equivalents dependent only on the pattern of inheritance, regardless of how mild or severe the phenotype may be.

genetic load

n.
1. The relative difference between the theoretically most fit genotype within a population and the average genotype.
2. The aggregate of deleterious genes that are carried, mostly hidden, in the genomes of a population and may be transmitted to descendants.

genetic load

the average number of accumulated detrimental genes per individual within a population, including those caused by mutation and selection within a recent generation and those inherited from ancestors. Genetic load is expressed in lethal equivalents.

ge·net·ic load

(jĕ-net'ik lōd)
The aggregate of more or less harmful genes that are carried, mostly hidden, in the genome and may be transmitted to descendants and cause disease.

genetic load

The totality of abnormalities caused in each generation by defective genetic material carried in the human gene pool.

genetic load

a measurement of the amount of deleterious genes in a population, calculated as the average number of lethal equivalents per individual.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Not only were we able to assess the KRAS mutational load, we were also able to identify the presence of minor alleles consistently.
In our selected set of colorectal cancer biopsies partially enriched for KRAS mutant-positive cases, digital PCR analysis of the KRAS mutational load produced an 8% increase in the identification of KRAS mutant-positive tumors, compared with conventional PCR.
The increase in average mutational load and inbreeding depression with increasing asexuality may be attributed to the increase in mutation rate per sexual generation, but that alone is insufficient to explain the overall pattern of inbreeding depression seen.
If the only effect of partial asexuality on equilibrium mutational load were mediated through the increase in mutation rate per sexual generation, we would expect to see higher threshold selfing rates as asexuality increases.
The mutational load could be purged by natural selection when populations experienced episodes of inbreeding, perhaps during bottlenecks of local populations (Lande and Schemske 1985; Charlesworth and Charlesworth 1987; Hedrick and Miller 1992).
The efficiency with which natural selection can reduce the mutational load depends on the underlying nature of that load.
The effect of linkage and population size on inbreeding depression due to mutational load.
Population extinction by mutational load and demographic stochasticity.
Although our understanding of the mechanisms of organelle replication and selection are still rudimentary, this discussion highlights the point that issues concerning the extinction of asexual populations via deleterious mutation are quite relevant to sexual species, even if the mutational load in the nuclear genome can be kept to a low level by recombination.
Early models of mutational load in large populations assumed that selection acts independently at different loci (Haldane 1937; Muller 1950).