mustard

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mustard

 [mus´terd]
1. a plant of the genus Brassica.
2. the ripe seeds of Brassica alba (white mustard) and B. nigra (black mustard), whose oils have irritant, stimulant, and emetic properties.
3. resembling, or something resembling, mustard in one or more of its properties.
nitrogen mustard mechlorethamine.

mus·tard

(mŭs'tărd),
1. The dried ripe seeds of Brassica alba (white mustard) and B. nigra (black mustard) (family Cruciferae).
2. Synonym(s): mustard gas
[O.Fr. moustarde, fr. L. mustum, must]

mustard

/mus·tard/ (mus´terd)
1. a plant of the genus Brassica.
2. the ripe seeds of Brassica alba (white mustard) and B. nigra (black mustard), whose oils have irritant, stimulant, and emetic properties.
3. resembling, or something resembling, mustard in one or more of its properties.

nitrogen mustard 
2. any of a group of cytotoxic, blistering alkylating agents homologous to the vesicant war gas dichlorodiethyl sulfide (mustard gas), some of which have been used as antineoplastics and immunosuppressants.

mustard

(1) Black mustard, see there; Brassica nigra.  
(2) White mustard, see there; Sinapsis alba.

mus·tard

(mŭs'tărd)
1. A plant of the genus Brassica with pungent edible seeds.
2. A semisolid preparation of mustard seeds used as a condiment.
3. A material having the appearance or consistency of mustard (2).
[O.Fr. moustarde, fr. L. mustum, must]

mustard,

n Latin names:
Brassica nigra, Brassica alba; part used: seeds; uses: diuretic, emetic, anti-inflammatory, mustard plaster for topical treatment of congestive respiratory complaints; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children, kidney disorders, ulcers, corrosive to unprotected skin, asthma. Also called
black mustard, brown mustard, California rape, charlock, Chinese mustard, Indian mustard, white mustard, or
wild mustard.

mustard

an irritant compound derived from the dried ripe seed of Brassica (Sinapis) alba, B. nigra or B. juncea. Contains toxic allyl isothiocyanate in nontoxic glycoside form, though the plant also contains myrosinase, an enzyme that converts the glycoside to the toxic form. Used as a carminative, emetic and counterirritant in poultices.

mustard gas
one of several gases used in military activities, e.g. dichlorodiethylsulfide. Causes vesication of skin, blindness due to corneal damage, and pulmonary edema if inhaled.
mustard greens
green foliage of several mustard-type plants, used in salads.
mustard oil
present in high concentrations in mustard plants and causes acute indigestion in animals.
mustard oil glucosinolates
toxic oil glucosinolates found in plants.
sulfur mustard
a synthetic compound with vesicant and other toxic properties.
tansy mustard
References in periodicals archive ?
The hottest mustards are made with cold water and less acidity; mustards made using hotter liquids and stronger acids are milder.
Mustard Girl All American Mustard is available in original Sweet N'Spicey Honey Mustard, as well as Stoneground Deli (spicy brown), Sweet N'Fancy Yellow, American Dijon and Zesty Horseradish.
The oriental mustard is used in the manufacture of Chinese style mustards and in a number of Cajun and East Indian dishes.
Our friendly waitress offered us a selection of complementary mustards - a mild but perky tarragon and mascarpone mustard going well with the fish dishes, a honey mustard, and a delicious punchy mulled wine mustard which went beautifully with the steak pies.
The fish was superb while the accompaniments brought it to a whole new sphere - as did the dollops of tarragon and cream and mulled wine mustards I asked for.
Under the long time selections imposed by nature and human, Chinese vegetable mustards have evolved from original dwarf shape into great variations in root, leaf, stem and seed stalk forms(Qi et al.
Traditional Chinese medicine, ayurvedic practitioners, and other healing traditions versed in herbal treatments rely on mustard as an expectorant.
The three types are yellow, aka white (Sinapis alba), the mildest and used mainly in American-style mustards and for pickling; brown (Brassica juncea), zestier and used in European-style mustards [like Dijon], for pickling, and in Indian cooking; and black (B.
This indeed is an extremely hot, blowyour-head-off style of mustard.
A chance meeting between Bruce Young, proprietor of Shaken Oak Products and Richard Jenkinson, founder of The Chiltern Brewery, which is based near Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire, led to all invitation by the brewery to make some sample mustards to complement its range of food products using Chiltern Brewery Beers.
Incredible horseradish mustards also come from the German repertoire, as do fantastic beer-based mustards and whole-grain varieties.
The Heinz mustard sits between the US squeezy varieties and traditional English mustards so it is a different proposition to Colman's.