muscle relaxant

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relaxant

 [re-lak´sant]
1. causing relaxation.
2. an agent that causes relaxation.
muscle relaxant an agent that specifically aids in reducing muscle tension.

mus·cle re·lax·ant

a drug with the capacity to reduce muscle tone; may be either a peripherally acting muscle relaxant such as curare and act to produce blockade at the neuromuscular junction (and thus useful in surgery), or act as a centrally acting muscle relaxant exerting its effects within the brain and spinal cord to diminish muscle tone (and thus useful in muscle spasm or spasticity).

muscle relaxant

an agent that reduces the contractility of muscle fibers. Curare derivatives and succinylcholine compete with acetylcholine and block neural transmission at the myoneural junction. These drugs are used during anesthesia, in the management of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation, and in shock therapy, to reduce muscle contractions in pharmacologically or electrically induced seizures. Several drugs that relieve muscle spasms act at various levels in the central nervous system: baclofen inhibits reflexes at the spinal level; cyclobenzaprine acts primarily in the brainstem; and the benzodiazepines reduce muscle tension, chiefly by acting on mechanisms that control muscle tone. Dantrolene acts directly on muscles in reducing contraction and apparently achieves its effect by interfering with the release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

muscle relaxant

Anesthesiology An agent used in anesthesiology to facilitate airway management, control alveolar ventilation, abolish motor reflexes, and provide the muscle relaxation. Depolarizing agents, eg succinylcholine, cause a prolonged depolarization of the motor end plate. Nondepolarizing agents, eg pancuronium, are competitive inhibitors of acetylcholine at the motor end plate See Depolarizing agent, Nondepolarizing agent.

mus·cle re·lax·ant

(mŭsĕl rĕ-laksănt)
Drug able to reduce muscle tone; may be either a peripherally acting muscle relaxant or act centrally acting.

mus·cle re·lax·ant

(mŭsĕl rĕ-laksănt)
Drug with capacity to reduce muscle tone; may be either a peripherally acting muscle relaxant such as curare and act to produce blockade at the neuromuscular junction (and thus useful in surgery), or act as a centrally acting muscle relaxant exerting its effects within the brain and spinal cord to diminish muscle tone (and thus useful in muscle spasm or spasticity).

muscle relaxant

an agent that specifically aids in reducing muscle tone. Most such agents inhibit the transmission of nerve impulses at the somatic neuromuscular junctions. They include tubocurarine, gallamine, pancuronium, succinylcholine and decamethonium bromide.
References in periodicals archive ?
To relieve pain, traditional remedies involve strong anti-inflammatory drugs or muscle relaxers -- many of which have scores of side effects that pain sufferers desperate for relief simply must contend with.
Bothered by back spasms on this trip, Mihm turned to electric stimulation, ice, anti-inflammatories and muscle relaxers - all with the knowledge that stepping on the court with O'Neal might be the worst thing for him.
Her union chief said: "She's now taking muscle relaxers and undergoing physical therapy.
Drugs seized from his home included heavy sedatives, tranquilizers, muscle relaxers and anesthesia, along with drugs to reverse a sedative effect or anesthesia to bring a person out of unconsciousness, and Viagra.
Laker notes: Brian Grant sat out practice Friday but said his sore neck felt better after taking anti-inflammatories and muscle relaxers.
The list also includes antidepressants such as Wellbutrin and Zoloft; sleeping pills, such as Ambien and Sonata; and muscle relaxers such as Skelaxin.