Müller cells

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Müller cells

Supporting cells that extend through the retina to form its inner and outer limiting membranes.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is possible because the zebrafish retina contains cells called Muller glia that harbor a gene that allows them to regenerate.
The team of researchers wanted see whether it was possible to use this gene to reprogram Muller glia in adult mice.
These Muller glia cells - a type of adult stem cell - is capable of transforming into the specialised cells in the back of the eye and could be useful for treating a wide range of sight disorders.
These Muller glia cells are a type of adult stem cell capable of transforming into the specialised cells in the back of the eye and may be useful for treating a wide range of sight disorders.
The pathogenic role of Muller glial cells in the neovascular process is explained in the subsequent chapter and the activation of Muller glia by pro-inflammatory factors is described.
Early studies in zebrafish led to the idea that dying retinal cells release signals that trigger support cells in the retinal called Muller glia to dedifferentiate -return to a stem-like state - and proliferate.
To test their idea, they injected GABA inhibitors into undamaged zebrafish eyes and found that the fish developed a regenerative response: Muller glia in the retina dedifferentiated and proliferated.
When a zebrafish's retina is damaged, HB-EGF is released and sets in motion a series of changes that cause certain cells in the retina known as Muller glia to revert to a stem-cell state from which they can generate new cells and repair the damage.
The researchers found that HB-EGF stimulated Muller glia to revert
The researchers suspected they develop from cells in the retina called Muller glia, known to have the ability to give rise to nerve cells, and in previous work another graduate student in Raymond's lab confirmed the suspicion.
In the current work, Zhao Qin, a graduate student in the department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, wanted to find what prompts Muller glia to start the regeneration process.
Writing about their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers revealed that they studied a particular retinal cell called the Muller glia.