mucin

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mucin

 [mu´sin]
a mucopolysaccharide or glycoprotein that is the chief constituent of mucus.

mu·cin

(myū'sin),
The hydrated form of mucinogen, a secretion containing carbohydrate-rich glycoproteins such as those from the goblet cells of the intestine, the submaxillary glands, and other mucous glandular cells; it is also present in the ground substance of connective tissue, especially mucous connective tissue, is soluble in alkaline water, and is precipitated by acetic acid; mucins lubricate and protect body cavity linings.

mucin

/mu·cin/ (mu´sin)
1. any of a group of protein-containing glycoconjugates with high sialic acid or sulfated polysaccharide content that compose the chief constituent of mucus.
2. any of a wide variety of glycoconjugates, including mucoproteins, glycoproteins, glycosaminoglycans, and glycolipids.

mucin

(myo͞o′sĭn)
n.
Any of a group of glycoproteins found especially in the secretions of mucous membranes.

mu′cin·ous adj.

mucin

[myo̅o̅′sin]
Etymology: L, mucus, slime
a mucopolysaccharide, the chief ingredient in mucus. Mucin is present in most glands that secrete mucus and is the lubricant protecting body surfaces from friction or erosion.

mu·cin

(myū'sin)
A secretion containing carbohydrate-rich glycoproteins such as that from the goblet cells of the intestine, the submaxillary glands, and other mucous glandular cells; it is also present in the ground substance of connective tissue.

mucin

A glycoprotein that is the main constituent of MUCUS. The term is also used as a generic name for the substance used as a drug formulated with xylitol as artificial saliva under the brand name is Saliva Orthana.

mucin

a MUCOPROTEIN that forms MUCUS when in solution.

Mucin

A protein in saliva that combines with sugars in the mouth to form plaque.
Mentioned in: Tooth Decay

mucin

Glycoprotein, rich in carbohydrates, produced by the goblet cells and the subsurface vesicles of the conjunctiva which forms the basis of the mucous layer of the precorneal film. Mucin and the secreted glycocalyx (which consists of glycoproteins) are adsorbed by the epithelium of the cornea to convert it from a hydrophobic into a wettable hydrophilic surface. A deficiency in the production of mucin leads to an abnormally short precorneal film break-up time and to desiccation of the ocular surface. In addition, the mucous layer prevents microbial invasion of the cornea. In some contact lens wearers (especially of silicone hydrogel lenses) collapsed mucin, as well as lipids and tear proteins, accumulate behind the lens and form small, discrete spheres (called mucin balls or mucin plugs). These mucin balls cause neither discomfort nor loss of vision. See precorneal film; keratoconjunctivitis sicca; break-up time test; xerophthalmia.

mu·cin

(myū'sin)
The hydrated form of mucinogen that lubricates and protects body cavity linings.

mucin

(mū´sin),
n a mucopolysaccharide, the chief ingredient of mucus. It is present in most glands that secrete mucus and is the lubricant that protects body surfaces from friction or erosion.

mucin

a mucopolysaccharide or glycoprotein which is the chief constituent of mucus.

mucin clot test
the adding of acetic acid to normal synovial fluid, which causes clot formation. The compactness of the clot and the clarity of the supernatant fluid are the criteria on which the result is based.
References in periodicals archive ?
The other case had adenocarcinoma with mucin production and serrated features, moderately differentiated morphology, and no overt goblet cell features (Table 2).
There was no significant effect of water temperature on the number of goblet cells containing acidic mucins in the stomach (P = 0.
In a 2003 study, researchers looked at several herbs that increase mucin production from mucin-producing cells.
Expression of membrane-associated mucins in cultivated human oral mucosal epithelial cells.
The reason that NAC is ineffective may be due to the fact that NAC only affects the mucin polymer structure leaving DNA and debris intact, resulting in secretions that are still viscid.
The sugar-laden molecule, a member of the mucin family, is similar to proteins found in human mucus and other natural lubricants and protective coatings.
Sulfated glycans on oral mucin as receptors for Helicobacter pylori.
Other mucins, in smaller quantities, are also secreted by the epithelia.
Mucins are high molecular weight glycoproteins present in the airway mucus and produced by goblet cells in the surface epithelium as well as mucous cells in the submucosal gland.