removal expenses

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Related to Moving Expenses: relocation expenses

removal expenses

As used in the UK, removal expenses refer to all expenses related to moving from one domicile to another
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, if your moving expenses are already covered by your employer, you cannot double-dip.
While debate raged about the merits of a well-paid, relatively privileged general having $72,000 in moving expenses covered by taxpayers, the family of a soldier who committed suicide three years ago received a cheque for one cent in release pay.
Option 1: If the owner relocates the tenant to a suitable housing accommodation at the same or lower regulated rent in close proximity, or in a new residential building constructed on the site, the owner must pay a $5,000 stipend to the tenant in addition to reasonable moving expenses.
A Your employer can pay your moving expenses tax free up to a limit of pounds 8,000, provided that the expenses are reasonable to your move and are within the Inland Revenue's approved list.
The Tax Reform Act of 1986 changed the tax treatment of moving expenses by requiring that they be classified as an itemized deduction on Schedule A.
5 cents a mile; for medical or moving expenses, 15 cents a mile; and when providing services to a charity, 14 cents a mile.
Most companies will pay relocation costs or provide an advance for moving expenses, but you should check the maximum your company will pay to assist in your relocation.
In addition to the major events noted above, I relayed my experience of having run across, with two separate clients, tax returns prepared by one local practitioner who had achieved large tax refunds for these clients by claiming, among other strange items, tens of thousands of dollars in moving expenses each of four consecutive years--but the clients never moved.
The company has offered to pay my moving expenses but will I be taxed on these?
The contract includes protection of jobs in case of a merger or transfer of ownership; increased rates of pay and an extended pay scale based on years of service; new holiday pay; moving expenses for involuntarily displaced flight attendants; increased minimum days off for line-holders; an eight-hour duty period; 90 days maternity leave; a formal grievance procedure; and a seniority-based process for reducing/recalling the workforce.
If we can spare some of those companies from having to search for new space and incur moving expenses in order to hold them in town, the benefit will be well worth it for New York.