mouth breathing

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breathing

 [brēth´ing]
ventilation (def. 2).
diaphragmatic breathing diaphragmatic respiration.
a type of breathing exercise that patients are taught to promote more effective aeration of the lungs, consisting of moving the diaphragm downward during inhalation and upward with exhalation.
frog breathing (glossopharyngeal breathing) respiration unaided by the primary or ordinary accessory muscles of respiration, the air being “swallowed” rapidly into the lungs by use of the tongue and the muscles of the pharynx; used by patients with chronic muscle paralysis to augment their vital capacity.
intermittent positive pressure breathing (IPPB) see intermittent positive pressure breathing.
mouth breathing breathing through the mouth instead of the nose, usually because of some obstruction in the nasal passages.
breathing pattern, ineffective a nursing diagnosis approved by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inspiration and/or expiration that does not provide adequate ventilation. Etiologic and contributing factors include disorders of the nervous system in which there is abnormal response to neural stimulation, as in spinal cord injury; impairment of musculoskeletal function, as in trauma to the chest; pain and discomfort associated with deep breathing, as after abdominal or thoracic surgery; fatigue and diminished energy level; inadequate lung expansion, as in poor body posture and positioning; inappropriate response to stress, as in hyperventilation; inflammation of respiratory structures; and tracheobronchial obstruction.

Subjective symptoms include reports of dyspnea, shortness of breath, pain associated with breathing, complaints of dizziness, and previous episodes of emotional or physical stress or fear and anxiety. Objective symptoms include increased respiratory rate and changes in depth of respirations, fremitus, abnormal arterial blood gases, nasal flaring, orthopnea or assumption of the three-point position, in which the patient sits down and elevates the shoulders by stiffening each arm and pushing downward with the hands on the chair or bed, use of accessory muscles of respiration, increased anteroposterior diameter of chest (barrel chest), and altered chest excursion.

The goal of nursing intervention is to help the patient experience improved gas exchange by using a more effective breathing pattern. This might include teaching appropriate breathing exercises and proper use of accessory muscles of respiration, and encouraging body posture that maximizes expansion of the lungs. If postoperative pain is a contributing factor, providing support of the operative site to reduce strain during coughing or moving about could encourage deeper respirations and a more normal breathing pattern. If a causative factor is stress with resultant hyperventilation or some other ineffective breathing pattern, the patient may need help in developing more beneficial coping mechanisms such as relaxation techniques.
pursed-lip breathing a breathing technique in which air is inhaled slowly through the nose and then exhaled slowly through pursed lips. This type of breathing is often used by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to prevent small airway collapse.
breathing-related sleep disorder any of several disorders characterized by sleep disruption due to some sleep-related breathing problem, resulting in excessive sleepiness or insomnia. Included are central and obstructive sleep apnea syndromes (see adult sleep apnea).

mouth breath·ing

habitual respiration through the mouth instead of the nose, usually due to obstruction of the nasal airways.

mouth breathing

breathing through the mouth instead of the nose, usually because of some obstruction of the nasal passages.

mouth breath·ing

(mowth brēdhing)
Habitual respiration through the mouth instead of the nose, usually due to obstructed nasal airways.

mouth breath·ing

(mowth brēdhing)
Habitual respiration through the mouth instead of the nose, usually due to obstruction of the nasal airways.
References in periodicals archive ?
Symptoms and signs of enlarged adenoids such as obstructive sleep apnoea, chronic mouth-breathing and hyponasal speech (4) should be sought.
I was just drifting along in this non-cognitive state I call "Zen Gun-Gazing"--unthinking, goggling at guns and gear; a condition marked by wide-open eyes, swiveling head, shallow mouth-breathing, and slow shuffling of my feet--when something that felt like a large boiled ham encased in an oversized baseball mitt dropped onto my shoulder.
I don't think I actually killed any squirrels, but they were visibly alarmed when a rawboned, mouth-breathing 14-year-old turned up with a 12-bore shotgun - as indeed you would have been.
Were Napoleon to trade his dance routines and "liger" obsession for nunchaku practice and a fascination with eagles, you'd have mouth-breathing Jarrod (Jemaine Clement).
When we breathe through our nose, the nasal passages heat and moisturise the air but this is bypassed by mouth-breathing.
Any dentist, orthodontist or physician can recognize the characteristics of what is called "adenoid facie" - a face that has developed an abnormally long, narrow bone structure due to chronic mouth-breathing over the growth years.
A blocked nose or collapsing nostrils encourage mouth-breathing, which may lead to air vibrating on the soft tissue at the back of the mouth.
Unless they're Scarlett Johansson in Lost In Translation, they aren't cute - as anyone who's ever had their burger served to them by a mouth-breathing 16-year-old in a Marilyn Manson T-shirt with a face erupting in volcanic pus will testify.