mourning

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mourning

 [mor´ning]
1. the normal psychological processes that follow the loss of a loved one; grief is the accompanying emotional state (see grieving). Four phases have been described: a short phase of numbness and denial, followed by a phase of yearning and protest marked by intense pining for the dead, followed by a phase of disorganization marked by pain and despair, ending in a phase of detachment and reorganization of love relationships that completes the work of mourning.
2. social expressions of grief, such as funeral and burial services, prayers, the wearing of black or other specific garments, or other rituals.

mourning

/mourn·ing/ (mor´ning)
1. the normal psychological processes that follow the loss of a loved one; grief is the accompanying emotional state.
2. social expressions of grief, such as funeral and burial services, prayers, or other rituals.

mourning

[mōr′ning]
Etymology: AS, murnan, to mourn
a response to the loss of a loved object. It is through mourning that grief is resolved. See also bereavement, grief.

mourning

Grief Psychiatry Reaction to a loss of a loved object–significant or important person, object, role, status, or anything considered part of one's life, which is a process of emotional detachment from that object, freeing the subject to find other interests

Mourning

The public expression of bereavement; it may include funerals and other rituals, special clothing, and symbolic gestures.
Mentioned in: Bereavement
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, denying mourning rituals to the bereaved resulted in the phenomenon of slave funerals being held under cover of night (Wright and Hughes xxv).
The Great War of 1914-1918 is described as a turning point which shattered the Christian culture of death and accelerated the decline in mourning rituals.
A more convincing treatment than Werline's would have identified new elements of penitential prayer in exilic and post-exilic texts, such as the use of mourning rituals (sackcloth, tearing of clothing).
Most of the traditional ancient mourning rituals are almost extinct.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Muslims in Nigeria held the annual Arbaeen (40 days of mourning for Imam Hossein after he was martyred on the day of Ahoura over 13 centuries ago) mourning rituals.
Early modern men and women's articulations of both occurred within a complex prism of ideological frames--of churching practices, mourning rituals, and spiritual accountings of childbirth.
For instance, Macintyre (1983: 134) observes that on Tubetube, many of the taboos and mourning rituals of the traditional sequence of events after death have been stopped, but that people still made traditional exchanges of food, and these exchanges still played the same role in solidifying kin groups.
They can write obituaries, plan the funeral, create other mourning rituals, block out schedules, send out acknowledgment cards, fill a vase with flowers, invite special friends over to reminisce, make a donation in honor of the deceased, get into an exercise routine, or take a class.