cougar

(redirected from Mountain lions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
A popular term for an older woman (30s to 50s) who sexually pursues younger men

cougar

a large, solid fawn-colored cat that resembles a short-legged maneless lion. Called also puma, mountain lion, Panthera concolor (syn. Felis concolor).
References in periodicals archive ?
In Los Angeles, residents are rallying to build one of the largest wildlife crossings in the world because of the plight of one lonely mountain lion named P-22.
This is not the first time concerns have been raised over the loss of genetic diversity among the mountain lions in the region.
The public took an interest in protecting him, and researchers have tracked him since his arrival in the city, learning much about how mountain lions survive in urban areas.
The mother ran out and physically removed her son from the mountain lion.
Mountain lions are solitary animals - they want their own territory and will fight and kill other mountain lions to keep it, thus forcing the smaller, weaker and younger mountain lions out.
They discovered the genetic diversity of mountain lions in the Santa Monica Mountains approached that of South Florida, where years of inbreeding had contributed to birth defects and reproductive failure.
Mountain lions were captured using leg-hold snares (Logan et al.
Mountain lions are part of where we live; one woke my wife up the other morning, yowling outside the bedroom window.
How likely is it that two or more migrating mountain lions could make such an extraordinary odyssey, somehow survive, encounter each other, and begin a new population here?
But if you kill a lion, you just opened up that territory and a new mountain lion is likely to move in and that will just continue the cycle of losing livestock and having to kill more mountain lions.
As mountain lions are rarely seen after or during an attack, it follows that published reports of detailed incidents with mountain lions that identify the attacker and the reasons it may have had to attack are important.
In Mountain Lions, Myths, and Media: A Critical Reevaluation of The Beast in the Garden, Wendy Keefover-Ring, director of the carnivore protection program at Sinapu, criticizes Baron's book as containing serious analytical, historical, and scientific errors and inadequacies.