mortise

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mor·tise

(mōr'tēs),
The seating for the talus formed by the union of the distal fibula and the tibia at the ankle joint.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr., fr. Ar. murtazz, fastened]

mortise

A depression, groove, or hole into which another anatomical structure fits.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bending moment capacity of rectangular mortise and tenon furniture joints.
Withdrawal, lateral shear, and bending moment capacities of round mortise and tenon joints.
Overall, results of the tests tend to indicate regular semi-rigid moment rotation behavior in round mortise and tenon joints.
The lateral shear strengths of the mortise and tenon connections are of concern and need to be determined.
Ongoing research with hybrid light timber fame constructions that utilize rectangular mortise and tenon joints, created a need for estimates of their semirigid behavior in bending.
Information concerning the structural characteristics of light timber frames constructed with round mortise and tenon joints along with information concerning semirigid connection factors for round mortise and tenon joints is essentially limited to the above study.
The mortise and tenon can be any shape, but should be of the same cross section, with a minimal clearance gap.
But when it comes to joinery, several of the most popular methods, including mortise and tenon, rabbet joints and dovetailing, have come to us straight out of history.
The use of round mortise and tenon joints in light timber frame construction provides the means for rapidly assembling house, farm, and light industrial building frames from a limited set of standard precut parts.
Still mostly associated with mortise and tenon joints, today's tenoners can be divided into two distinct product categories: those for processing solid wood components and those for processing composite panels.
In the construction of light timber frames with round mortise and tenon joints, the tenons on the ends of members are often loaded in double shear by the constructions into which they frame.
About two years ago, the company decided to switch its chair construction from doweling to mortise and tenon joints.