morpheme

(redirected from Morpho-syntactic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

mor·pheme

(mōr'fēm),
The smallest linguistic unit with a meaning.
[G. morphē, form + -eme, from phoneme, G. phēmē, utterance]

morpheme

The smallest semantically meaningful unit of a spoken language (words, prefixes or suffixes) that have discrete meanings. The formal study of morphemes is termed morphology.

morpheme

(mor'fem)
The smallest meaningful grammatical unit in a language (e.g., the s in “beds”).
See: phoneme

morpheme

The smallest element of speech that conveys either factual or grammatical information. Compare with phoneme which is a speech sound that serves to distinguish one word from another.
References in periodicals archive ?
The morpho-syntactic behaviour of names (different from that of common words) is a corollary of their lexical semantic poverty.
This notional property determines the morpho-syntactic distribution of names (which in turn distinguishes for the hearer/reader the identity of names distinct from any homophonous words of other classes).
This supports the view within the LGM when it is postulated that, prior to the assignment of morpho-syntactic rules, there is a linking phase between the LTs of a class and the constructions where the predicates of such a class participate.
Once we have presented an adequate description of the semantics of the constructions in which the group of verbs sharing the core meaning of sound participate, the second phase of linking will make use of a set of morpho-syntactic rules in order to describe the morphological and syntactic structure of the constituents in the different constructions.
Consequently, they also have morpho-syntactic characteristics: in OE macroroles are only assigned to core arguments, that is, arguments marked by a grammatical case, in opposition to oblique arguments, which are introduced by argument-marking or argument-adjunct prepositions or appear as oblique noun phrases.
Applying the macrorole and case assignment principles to the constructional LT corresponding to the agent-subject construction, its morpho-syntactic behaviour will be as follows:
He describes the marks of successive "cyclicity" such as syntax, morphology, phonology, semantics and morpho-syntactic evidence from overtly stranded pieces, the distribution of intermediate "landing sites," the timing of those intermediate steps, the motivation for intermediate steps, alternate views of successive cyclicity, and other aspects of locality.
The author investigates three morpho-syntactic variables--the negation system in Egyptian Colloquial Arabic (ECA) and Modern Standard Arabic (MSA), aspects of the system of deixis in ECA and MSA and the ECA aspectual marker b- in actual data; looks at ways that language function affects language form; and examines the role of the speaker, audience and situation in language choice in monologues.