Moro

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Mo·ro

(mō'rō),
Ernst, German physician, 1874-1951. See: Moro reflex.
References in periodicals archive ?
We may have all the arms in the world, and yet there will be no victory [without the support of the Moro people]," Murad said.
Le president du Venezuela releve les relations privilegiees avec l'Algerie Le president de la Republique bolivarienne du Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro Moros, a salue, hier, les relations [beaucoup moins que] privilegiees [beaucoup plus grand que] existant entre l'Algerie et son pays.
beaucoup moins que]L'attitude des moros face a la mutinerie[beaucoup plus grand que] (Algazarra, 1997).
This analysis is specifically interested in the Orbajosans' implementation of the concept of moros y cristianos in response to the impending siege of modernization that favored a national culture over that of local identities.
An estimated seven million inhabitants of the Philippines are Moros, the majority of them are in Mindanao.
THE MESSAGE WAS CONVEYED BY THE VENEZUELAN FOREIGN MINISTER NICOLAS MADURO MOROS.
But if it is OIC itself and not any particular country or countries, then that is indeed a significant development for the Moros because they can have a forum to go for human rights (issues), said Mastura
The mediation process between the parties to the litigation and the Levitt and Moros families, entered into at the recommendation of the Supreme Court, is ongoing.
As the Spanish saying puts it, in that century the Muslim world stretched "de moros a moros," (from the Moors of North Africa and Spain to the Moros of the Philippines).
The Mindanao conflict first flared in the 1960s when the Muslim minority - known as the Moros - took up arms.
While some of these kids, being torn away from their parents, arrived in America emotionally distressed, Machado's painful migration centered around his stomach--a stomach which until that moment was accustomed to a culinary fiesta of Cuban dishes ranging from sour orange-flavored Cuban fried chicken with the black-bean-and-white-rice dish known as moros y cristianos to shrimp and spicy tomato sauce, and Basque-influenced meals like roast lamb with rosemary.
In this first of two planned books on the subject, Fulton relates the once headline-grabbing story of America's campaign to put the Moros, Muslims of the southern Philippines, under their territorial rule at the turn of the 20th century.