moose

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moose

largest of the deer, 6 feet at the withers, 2000 pounds. Males have a prominent roman nose and overhanging upper lip, dark brown coat with white legs. Called also American moose, Alces americana, Alces alces.

moose disease/sickness
see neurofilariasis. Called also moose sickness.
moose tick
see dermacentoralbipictus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moose provide a challenging and rewarding subject for naturalists, photographers, painters, and outdoor recreationists (Fraser 1978).
Bisset (1987) used this value to speculate that the total value of moose in wildlife appreciation including non-consumptive use could be as much as $1,315 million in 1982.
The commercial value of moose is often associated with the economic impact of commercial outfitters who market a hunt.
Moose are used to market and sell a wide variety of products throughout North America (Appendix).
Scientific studies of moose have been carried out by many agencies as summarized in 19 Chapters in Ecology and Management of the North American Moose (Franzmann and Schwartz 1998).
Intense moose browsing on deciduous shrubs and trees, particularly in winter, is considered beneficial by providing a release effect on adjacent commercially more valuable coniferous tree species (Lavsund 1987, Andren and Angelstem 1993, Posner and Jordan 2002).
The Distinguished Moose Biologist Award had 2 recipients; Vince Crichton for his research and management work in Manitoba, and Michele Crete, for his research in population dynamics.
In May of 1988 I traveled to the USSR as the guest of the Soviet Academy of Sciences to meet with our Russian colleagues regarding the Moose Symposium they would host in Syktyvkar and Pechora in 1990.
Education and public participation in moose management was the theme for the meeting.
Bob Stewart chaired the sessions and the conference theme was GIS Systems and Integrated Moose Management.
The Third International Moose Symposium was hosted by the Komi Science Center, Ural Division of the USSR Academy of Sciences in Syktyvkar, Komi Autonomous Socialist Republic, USSR on August 27 through September 5, 1990 and was attended by biologists from Canada, Finland, Germany, Norway, Sweden, United States, and the USSR.
Chuck was also the winner of the Distinguished Moose Biologist Award that year for his pioneering work in moose physiology and population dynamics.