monounsaturated fat

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monounsaturated fat

A saturated fatty acid (i.e., an alkyl chain fatty acid) with one ethylenic (double) bond between the carbons in the fatty acid chain.

monounsaturated fat

A saturated fatty acid–ie, an alkyl chain fatty acid with one ethylenic–double bond between the carbons in the fatty acid chain. See Fatty acid, Saturated fatty acid; Cf Polyunsaturated fatty acid, Unsaturated fatty acid.

mon·o·un·sat·ur·at·ed fat

(mon'ō-ŭn-sach'ŭr-ā-tĕd fat)
A type of unsaturated fat that may help to reduce blood cholesterol levels.
References in periodicals archive ?
A relatively simple change--substituting monounsaturates for saturated fats--can achieve that a lot more easily, he argues, than making people look up food choices in GI tables before they sit down to eat.
Avocado is rich in monounsaturates and supplies folate plus vitamins E and B6, potassium and magnesium - important for heart, nervous system and skin.
Provides monounsaturates, protein for healthy muscles and tissues and plenty of fibre.
3g salt This spread is high in monounsaturates and is made with milk, so provides calcium.
Like extra virgin, it's extremely high in healthy monounsaturates.
The healthiest salad oil is highest in monounsaturates linked with lower rates of heart disease.
Monounsaturates, on the other hand, lowered LDLs but slightly boosted HDLs when substituted for saturates.
Although technically a legume rather than a nut, peanuts also pack a hefty dose; monounsaturates comprise roughly 50 percent of their fat.
HAZELNUTS: Very good source of Vitamin E and monounsaturates - both help protect against heart attacks.
For each 10 grams of monounsaturates that a woman consumed daily, the risk of breast cancer fell by 55 percent.
Not only did the feed contain twice the normal amount of fat, but that fat was derived primarily from canola and soybeans-rich in heart-friendly monounsaturates (SN: 6/9/90, p.
For instance, the analysis showed that saturated fats, fish oils, and vegetable fats were not linked to greater risk of invasive cancer, whereas high consumption of monounsaturates did appear to increase risk somewhat.