monoclonal antibody therapy

(redirected from Monoclonal antibody therapy of cancer)

monoclonal antibody therapy

The use of monoclonal antibodies to suppress immune function, kill target cells, or treat specific inflammatory diseases. Because of their high level of specificity, they bind to precise cellular or molecular targets. A potential problem associated with the use of monoclonal antibodies is an allergic reaction to the foreign antigens in the antibody, since they are created from mouse cells. Monoclonal antibodies have numerous uses in health care. See: table; hybridoma; monoclonal antibody
Name of AntibodyCondition Treated or Prevented
AdalimumabRheumatoid arthritis; psoriasis
BevacizumabSolid tumors
EdrecolomabSolid tumors
EfalizumabPsoriasis
EnlimomabOrgan transplant rejection
IbritumomabFollicular lymphoma
InfliximabCrohn's disease; rheumatoid arthritis
NatalizumabRelapsing forms of multiple sclerosis
OmalizumabAllergic rhinitis
OKT3Organ transplant rejection
PalivizumabRespiratory syncytial virus
RituximabLeukemias and lymphomas
RhuMAb/VEGFSolid tumors
TositumomabB cell lymphoma
TranstuzumabMetastatic breast cancer
References in periodicals archive ?
Louis Weiner, director of the cancer centre at GUMC, says that monoclonal antibody therapy of cancer can be improved to be much more powerful than it is today with modifications.

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