Mollusca


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Mol·lus·ca

(mo-lŭs'kă),
A phylum of the subkingdom Metazoa with soft, unsegmented bodies, consisting of an anterior head, a dorsal visceral mass and a ventral foot. Most forms are enclosed in a protective calcareous shell. Mollusca includes the classes Gastropoda (snails, whelks, slugs), Pelecypoda (oysters, clams, mussels), Cephalopoda (squids, octopuses), Amphineura (chitons), Scaphopoda (tooth shells), and the class of primitive metameric mollusks, Monoplacophora.
[L. mollusca, a nut with a thin shell, fr. mollis, soft]

Mollusca

(mŏl-lŭs′kă)
A phylum of animals that includes the bivalves (mussels, oysters, clams), slugs, and snails. Snails are intermediate hosts for many parasitic flukes. Oysters, clams, and mussels, esp. if inadequately cooked, may transmit the hepatitis A virus or bacterial pathogens.
References in periodicals archive ?
The preferential distribution of Mollusca in DISC, DS_5m, and DS_25m (85%, 98%, and 98% organisms, respectively), compared upstream control region (66% organisms) and the very strong correlation (> 0.
Mollusca (mainly Cephalopoda and Gastropoda) played a more secondary role in the diet of S.
Mollusca of Colorado, Utah, Montana, Idaho and Wyoming.
In most phyla, although simple photoreception is almost universally present, no eyes evolved, but eyes evolved later in Annelida, Mollusca, Onychophora, and Chordata.
9-60, divided into mollusca, arthropoda and vertebrata) and "Evaluations" (pp.
They are members of the Mollusca order (like snails and slugs) and the class Cephalopoda which means "head-foots.
Among the 236 species of polychaete worms from the deep western North Atlantic, 64 percent are undescribed, and among bivalve mollusca, one of the better known groups of the deep-sea benthos, 105 new species (about 43 percent of all species collected) have been described over the last 20 years.
The paleontology of rostroconch mollusks and the early history of the phylum Mollusca.
Primary type specimens of marine Mollusca (excluding Cephalopoda) in the South African Museum.
These include fossils of bacteria, algae, plants, sponge, corals, worms, bryoza, brachiopods, mollusca (including cephalopods, bivalves, and gastropods), echinodermata, graptolites, arthropods, fish, amphibians, reptiles, and mammals.
Echinoid remains, Stromatholite, Radiolaria, Mollusca fragments, Gastropoda, Serpulids, Corals, Stromatoporidea