molecular sieve

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mo·lec·u·lar sieve

a gellike material with pore sizes of such ranges as to exclude molecules above certain sizes; used in fractionating or purifying macromolecules.

molecular sieve

1 a crystalline chemical separation device with molecular size pores that adsorbs small but not large molecules.
2 a cross-linked polymer that forms a porous sieve used as a supporting medium for chromatographic separation of mixtures of solutes.

molecular sieve

A material (e.g., oxides: silicate, aluminate, zeolite crystals with pores) which is capable of separating molecules based on size.

molecular sieve

A type of sieve in which the molecular material present in the gel or crystal will adsorb molecules of a certain kind and let others pass.
See also: sieve
References in periodicals archive ?
Molecular sieves are the largest segment of adsorbents that have very small pores of precise and uniform size.
Wheel-type dryers need 350 F (175 C) for canister-bed type desiccant, or 400 F (205 C) for molecular sieves.
Molecular sieves were added to allyl hydrazine, which was previously treated with KOH, BaO, and Ca[H.
In the 1980s, molecular sieves, also known as synthetic zeolite desiccants, that could be designed at the molecular level emerged.
Carbon molecular sieves are microporous materials having a very narrow pore size distribution range with pore dimensions similar to the critical dimensions of the gas molecules to be separated (Fig 4).
My field is in silicate chemistry and materials, specifically in zeolite molecular sieves, a class of industrial materials used widely throughout the petroleum refining, petrochemical and chemical industries.
As it can be observed from entry 7, addition of molecular sieves improves the yield.
Molecular sieves were added to the reaction mixture to prevent undesirable hydrolysis from taking place.
The integration of molecular sieves into archival papers has allowed for the enclosures constructed from them to actually trap harmful off-gassed materials such as acetic acid from acetate film stock.
To improve on nature's molecular sieves, many researchers are developing synthetic varieties whose properties they can tailor (SN: 6/23/01, p.
Monomers must be purified and dried by molecular sieves.

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