maithuna

(redirected from Mithuna)

maithuna

A Sanskrit term used in Tantra for sexual union in the context of a ritual.
References in periodicals archive ?
added Mithuna Shetty, with Afzal Hussain chiming in with, "Congratulations Oman on winning in the semifinals and getting through to the final.
An especially fine example of a mithuna can be seen in a terracotta panel from Chandraketugarh depicting the pair festooned in jewellery and trinkets and typifying the decorative taste found in works from this area.
The children who lost their lives were identified as Sajna (5), Mithuna (5), Ramshana (6), Nandana (6), Anushree (8), Sneha (8), Santra (8), Sona (7) and Vaishnav.
The Upanishadic texts have even glorified sexual union, and the visual arts of classical India have embodied the vigour of mithuna (sexual union) and human body on the exterior portions of temples--[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] deva mandiram--body is the abode of divinity.
Would, for that matter, Shusterman prefer the picture of an Indian mithuna sculpture in which both the partners are passionately conscious of their bodies?
Although these were built in the 10th century, the theme of sensual pleasure in the erotic mithuna figures has a sculptural ancestry of at least a thousand years, going back to before the onset of the Christian millennium (Watson 91).
In the context of a sexual issue, the hymn's audience would have associated the adverb mithu, "oppositely," with the etymologically related mithuna, "forming an opposition," "forming a pair," or, as a neuter noun, a "pairing," especially a male and female couple.
Mithuna figure from the Hucchappa Math, Aihole: 7th-8th century.
ddhi dvayor adadha ukthyam vaco yatasruca mithuna ya saparyatah
The thematic classification of terracottas offered by the authors is straightforward: mother and child; birth-giving mother; Shri Lakshmi and associated types; lady with hairpins; ganas, yakshas, and nagas; male and female figures with different attributes; mithuna plaques; animal riders; plaques with narrative content; plaques and figurines of animals; and miscellaneous.
The multitude of divine figures stationed between these two kinds of essential images, each on a facet and having a console of its own, are Nagas, Sardulas, Apsaras, Surasundaris, Mithunas, etc.
Drawing a distinction between depictions of mithunas (amorous couples) and maithuna (coitus), Desai states that the earliest maithuna scenes in temple art belong to the 6th-7th century, a period "when the Tantras came to be accepted by the literate class" (p.