mithridate

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Related to Mithridates: Spartacus, Pontus

mithridate

(mĭth′rĭ-dāt′)
n.
An antidote against poison, especially a confection formerly held to be an antidote to all poisons.
References in periodicals archive ?
In exchange for the help during this battle, Mithridates offered the Galatians land in Anatolia.
Here, within the ceremonial apadana, the court and people assemble to hear the double trial of Mithridates and Dionysius, although following on from that event Chariton takes us even further into the heart of the royal court and allows us, quite unexpectedly, to gaze into the forbidden space of the inner quarters of the royal palace itself.
Antik devire iliskin az sayidaki seyahatname ve gorsel belge ile birlikte gunumuze bircok onarim gecirerek gelen surlar, Serapis Tapinagi ve Mithridates Sarayi'na ait kalintilar ile Bizans devrine ait Balatlar Kilisesi disinda hicbir yapi ya da yapi kalintisinin gunumuze ulasmamis olmasi kentin bu donemdeki gorunumunu karanlikta birakmaktadir.
600 BC, had particular prominence as a naval base both for Mithridates VI Eupator and later in 14 BC for Agrippa's potential intervention in the Bosporan Kingdom.
Like Mithridates, his toxic drafts in time prove a tonic against despair when taken in immunizing doses.
The Poison King: The Life and Legend of Mithridates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy.
The Kabbalah found a particularly receptive audience among Christian scholars, church leaders, and intellectuals, including Pico della Mirandola, Johannes Reuchlin, and Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa, as well as such Jewish converts to Christianity as della Mirandola's mentor, Flavius Mithridates, and Rabbi Abner de Burgos, who took the name of Alfonso de Valladolid.
A statue of Dionysus from 2nd-century Rome has the face of Alexander, so too, do busts of Mithridates and Achilles.
Surathilhagi Mahomedi traductio/ Flavius Mithridates (C), 1480/1481 (32) Citta del Vaticano, BAV, Vat.
Scipio's Dream" is one of the series of operas that Mozart dedicated to ancient army commanders and emperors but from this series I am more attracted to Idomeneo in "Idomeneo, the King of Crete", Mithridates, the King of Pontus or Alexander, the King of Macedonia in "The Shepherd King".
4) that is, the limits of their potential, they "can" choose to train themselves on the possible (the "can") of this all, like Mithridates, and to distill this bitter brew further so as to rule themselves and help others.