misogynist

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misogynist

(mĭ-sŏj′ə-nĭst)
n.
One who hates or mistrusts women.

mi·sog′y·nis′tic (-ə-nĭs′tĭk), mi·sog′y·nous (-ə-nəs) adj.

misogynist

(mĭs-ŏj′ĭ-nĭst) [″ + gyne, woman]
One who hates women.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Like Jones and Patterson, the names of female colleagues in the US State Department would spontaneously leap to the mind of their misogynist superiors when new ambassadors should be nominated for filling vacant jobs in hot spots across the globe in general and in Central Asia and the Middle East in particular.
As I have shown, Christine's Lady Reason associates misogynists with queerness from the very beginning of the City.
Outlining for Christine the process by which men become misogynists, Reason says that they are "ces viellars, ainsi corrompus" (1.
Reason again posits an interrelationship between misogyny, sexual impotence, and social emasculation when she cites Ovid as an example of why men become misogynists.
Speaking of corrupt old men generally, and of Ovid in particular, Reason narrates how misogynists are queers morphologically and socially.
Misogynists oppose la grant amour that, by the will of God, all men naturally ought to have for women.
Describing misogyny as contre nature and desnaturee, Reason alludes to medieval antisodomy discourses, (11) and her suggestion that misogynists do not erotically favor women works to insinuate something queer about their sexuality.
6 This kind of cleverly-crafted (as the misogynists saw it) verbal depiction of woman culminates in the late Renaissance and early seventeenth century with Jacques Olivier's Alphabet de l'imperfection et malice des femmes (1617).
For Crenne's position on "spinning," the oppressive symbol referred to by Labe and used by most if not all misogynists to keep woman in her place, see Epistre invective 4: "Et parlant en general tu dis que femmes sont de rudes & obnubilez esperitz: parquoy tu concludz, que autre occupation ne doibvent avoir que le fuller.
We will begin where all early modern feminists, from Christine de Pizan to Helisenne de Crenne and beyond, begin: in the beginning was the word, and the word was misogynist.
Much closer to Crenne were the misogynist and extremely disparaging words of Gratien du Pont, whose Controverses des sexes masculin et femenin are, I am now convinced, what occasioned Crenne's own literary activity in composing her Epistres familieres et invectives, or at least large parts of the Epistres.
In a word, or rather in the form of a checkerboard,(5) woman, and woman viewed in particular through Christian misogynist eyes, is all of the following: "femme abuseresse," "de maulx affluante," "infaicte meschante," "au monde nuysante," "grande tromperesse," "en bien negligente," "en luxure ardente," "charogne puante," "de vices regente," "en scavoir asnesse," "de vertu impotente," "de mal instiguante," "des bons bayssante," "grande pecheresse," "oeuvre insuffisante," "a Dieu malplaisante," "d'orgueil la deesse," "de l'homme servante," and so forth.