soil

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Related to Mineral soil: Mineral weathering

soil

(soyl),
Dirt.

soil

the uppermost layer of the earth's crust that supports the majority of terrestrial plant life together with many animals and microorganisms. Soil derives from the erosion of the rock strata and contains minerals and variable amounts of organic material derived from organisms which live or have lived upon it. Soils are affected by climate, living organisms, parent rock, relief, groundwater and age, and usually contain various ‘horizons’, the succession of which is called the ‘soil profile’. MULL soils tend to be alkaline and ‘Mor’ soils acid. Soils may be heavy clay, loam (sand and clay), peaty (large amounts of dead plant material), chalky light or sandy

soil

the earth, origin of all plant growth and the basis of all animal agriculture. Its characteristics of chemical composition, physical structure, especially porosity and water retaining capacity, its humus content, pH and salinity exert enormous effects on its productivity.

soil analysis
an essential activity in densely farmed farms. Measures the soil content of total and available amounts of each of the important soil minerals.
soil contaminated herbage
either from dust storms or in loose soil by hoof movement may contribute to dental attrition in sheep, or sand colic in horses.
soil eating
a form of pica; caused by salt deficiency.
soil fumigants
are used to prepare fields for planting and may cause poisoning in animals grazing them or eating crops harvested from them. See methyl bromide.
soil type
includes clay, sand, loam.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kothawala DN, Roehm C, Blodau C, Moore TR (2012) Selective adsorption of dissolved organic matter to mineral soils.
Southward-sloping terrain, ridges oriented perpendicular to the general gradient of sloping and shallow depressions at the surface of mineral soil are the topographic factors which have initiated and strongly influenced the development of the Selisoo mire and its spatio-temporal dynamics.
The most important physicochemical parameter of the soil is pH, which affects plant growth and the behaviour of the contaminants in soils: the present study showed considerable differences in the pH values of the two soils; the pH of the mineral soils ranged from 4.
Soil microbiota was determined by the standard method of the sowing of organic or mineral soil suspension on the agarised nutrient medium (Thompson, Vincent 1967).
The study focused on the mineral soil material, since this is the location for most of the plant roots, and the organic horizon was very variable at each plot (ranging from 2 to 12 cm thickness at replicate location within plots).
Effect of tree species on carbon stocks in forest floor and mineral soil and implications for soil carbon inventories.
At the Truckee site, dry patches or layers of organic material remained above the wetted mineral soil.
Changes in pH with burning are very dependent on the amount and nature of the ash, the depth of sampling, time after fire and the time the ash has been in contact (liming effect of ash) with the mineral soil (Kutiel & al.
All the conditions for successful seedling establishment by white spruce, a mineral soil seedbed, well-drained soil, deep seasonal thaw, and little shading by surrounding plants (Zasada and Gregory, 1969), are present at this site.
However, relatively less attention has been paid to the quantification of the effects of soil fauna on organic matter stabilization and accumulation in mineral soil (Wolters 2000).
The continued incorporation of the underlying mineral soil into the upper organic layer would also result in an overall lowering of the organic carbon content.
In the 27-yr-old pine plantation on the mineral soil layer a 1-3 cm thick poorly decomposed O-horizon had formed, mainly needle litter, which was densely rooted; short-root parameters were determined separately for O-horizon and 0-10 cm mineral soil layer, due to big differences in soil properties (Table 1).