millibar

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mil·li·bar

(mil'i-bar),
One thousandth of a bar; 100 newtons per m2; 0.75006 mm Hg; standard atmospheric pressure is 1013 millibars.

millibar

(mĭl′ĭ-băr)
One thousandth of a bar, which is 100 newtons/sq m. The normal atmospheric pressure of 14.7 lb/sq in is equal to 1013 millibars.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this pattern of high pressure Siberia with 1035 millibars from Siberia which enters Iran from north east of it that always carries Siberian cold weather with penetrating cold weather causes almost intense air sustainability over Iran.
At pressures higher than some millibars the molecular flux upon the moving mass is highly uniform, so the sum of every momentum discharged by the molecules on the sphere is null for any practical purpose.
The intensity of a hurricane can be rated by its lowest central atmospheric pressure, as measured in millibars (mb).
Barometric pressure must be in units of millibars and the values must be absolute.
A barometer measures atmospheric pressure in metric units called millibars.
The storm's 882 millibars of pressure broke the record low of 888 set by Hurricane Gilbert in 1988.
Central pressure: over 980 millibars (1 inch of mercury is about 34 millibars);
Vortex meters for example, can produce a pressure drop of anywhere between low tens to low hundreds of millibars for a similar measurement system, while the pressure drop across an equivalent orifice plate can be even higher.
The next comparable disaster in the area was the 1991 Bangladesh cyclone with winds around 250 km/h, pressure measured at 898 millibars, and a 6 m storm surge.
When the Great New England Hurricane roared through Connecticut in 1938, a central barometric pressure of 950 millibars was recorded in Hartford, corresponding to a Category 3 storm on the Saffir Simpson Scale.
The membrane is lifted off the sealing surface at a pressure of around 3 millibars, allowing the overpressure to escape, and preventing the bag from inflating.
A good rule of thumb in barometer watching is that when the meter rises or falls eight to ten millibars or more in less than three hours, a major change is in the works.