microwave

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microwave

 [mi´kro-wāv]
a wave typical of electromagnetic radiation between far infrared and radiowaves.

microwave

/mi·cro·wave/ (-wāv) a wave of electromagnetic radiation between far infrared and radio waves, regarded as extending from 300,000 to 100 megahertz (wavelength of 1 mm to 30 cm).

microwave

Etymology: Gk, mikros + AS, wafian, wave
electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength of 1 mm to 30 cm.

microwave

A 1–100 gigaHerz (109) wave on the electromagnetic spectrum with a wavelength of 1–1000 mm.

Public health
Exposure to microwaves is linked to domestic microwave ovens; leakage of infrared waves ranges from 1 milliWatt/cm2 at the time of sale of a microwave oven to 5 mW/cm2, measured at a distance of 2 inches. Older pacemakers tended to misfire when the wearer was exposed to early microwave ovens, which were also linked to an increase in cataracts.
 
Hazards
Mechanical—eggs and popcorn are particularly hazardous, as they can explode, and the microwaving of metallic objects can result in a fire hazard.
  
There is little data to suggest that microwave exposure is associated with increased morbidity.

microwave

Therapeutics Deep heat therapy The administration of electromagnetic waves that pass between electrodes placed on the Pt's skin, creating heat that ↑ blood flow and relieves muscle and joint pain

microwave

a wave typical of electromagnetic radiation between far infrared and radiowaves.

microwave acupuncture
utilizes deeply penetrating heat, produced by a microwave generator and transmitted via acupuncture needles.
References in periodicals archive ?
The microwave energy then separates the clay or binding materials from the sand.
Research continues in the use of microwave energy and microwave assisted processing for waste remediation and for a wide variety of applications.
As can be seen, the loss factor of water decreases with increasing temperature, because at room temperature, the relaxation frequency of the small water molecules is already larger than the microwave frequency, and with increasing temperature it moves further from the microwave frequency, resulting in a lower absorption of microwave energy.
2C), microwave energy heated the total cross section of the timber.
The puree treated in the 5-kW microwave absorbed 88% and 90% of the microwave energy when it was heated and reached end point temperatures of 90 C and 121 C, respectively.
This product is a lightly metallized PET film that converts microwave energy into heat.
Nelson joined the ARS in 1954 and was chosen for his pioneering research on the dielectric properties of agricultural products, applications of radio-frequency and microwave energy, and electrical measurements for moisture sensing in cereal grains.
The microbial inactivation kinetics involved in microwave energy are similar to those found in conventional thermal processes.
When the microwave energy is no longer being absorbed by the sample the test is automatically terminated.
The carbon is periodically regenerated with microwave energy and reused.
has a specific absorption rate (SAR) rating, which measures how much microwave energy from the phone can penetrate the brain.
Halverson envisions that the practical application of this research technology will result in equipment that will apply microwave energy to the grain as it flows continuously from bucket elevators and into storage facilities.

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