Microsporum canis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Microsporum canis: Trichophyton tonsurans, Microsporum gypseum

Mi·cros·po·rum ca·nis

the principal cause of ringworm in dogs and cats and a zoophilic fungal species of fungi causing sporadic dermatophytosis in humans, especially tinea capitis in children with cats and dogs.

Mi·cros·po·rum ca·nis

, var. distortum (mī-krō-spō'rŭm kā'nis, dis-tōr'tum)
A zoophilic fungus common in cats and dogs; in humans, infects the scalp and skin; rarely infects nails.

Microsporum canis

The causative agent of ringworm in cats and dogs. It may be easily transmitted to children.
See also: Microsporum

Microsporum canis

; M. canis common fungus causing tinea pedis (athlete's foot)
References in periodicals archive ?
Uber eine Microsporum -Enzootie bei Kappen-Gibbons (Hylobates lar) verursacht durch eine Variante von Microsporum canis [About a Microsporum enzootic in white-handed gibbons (Hylobates lar) caused by a variant of Microsporum canis].
5 mm de diametro de inhibicion para 10 000 ppm del aceite evidenciando una actividad inhibitoria frente al Microsporum canis aislado de cuadros clinicos en perros con dermatitis micotica (Cuadro 2).
Corte histologico donde se observan las hifas caracteristicas de Microsporum canis (HyE, 40x).
Candida albicans and Microsporum canis both are humane pathogens and are responsible for humane mycosis.
A dermatofitose e uma micose frequente em caes, sendo a infeccao relacionada predominantemente a Microsporum canis.
Topics include fungi in paleoenvironments; fungi in the air and in water; the use of thermophilic molds in environmental management; hallucinogenic mushrooms; and control of the feline pathogen Microsporum canis.
2]:MeOH) (2:1), etanol (EtOH) y decocciones, de inflorescencias, hojas y tallos de plantas silvestres y plantas in vitro de Piper tuberculatum ("matico" o "cordoncillo") sobre Trichophyton rubrum, Microsporum canis y M.
The SRRC researchers have also recently collaborated with physician Thomas Walsh and others at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), in Bethesda, Maryland, to study CAY-1 activity against Microsporum canis and Trichophyton rubrum, which are dermatophytic, or skin, fungal pathogens that infect immunocompromised individuals.
For patients with Microsporum canis, mycological and clinical cure rates were significantly higher for patients treated with griseofulvin than those treated with terbinafine oral granules (Elewski et al.