microsatellite instability


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microsatellite instability

An abnormality in a DNA sequence in which a microsatellite (repeating 2–6 nucleotides) found in intronic DNA is either longer or shorter than normal, which is most commonly due to defective mismatch repair.

microsatellite instability

A detectable change in the number of DNA repeat sequences that may lead to mutations in mismatch-repair genes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Detection of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiencies by immunohistochemistry can effectively diagnose the microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype in endometrial carcinomas.
2014) DNA methylation alterations of AXIN2 in serrated adenomas and colon carcinomas with microsatellite instability.
PTGER2 overexpression in colorectal cancer is associated with microsatellite instability, independent of CpG island methylator phenotype," Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, vol.
Immunohistochemistry versus microsatellite instability testing for screening colorectal cancer patients at risk for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome.
Mutation and over expression of p53, apoptosis-related genes, myc amplification, mutations of the cadherin/catenin membrane complex, microsatellite instability and expression of CD44 are included in the molecular alterations already identified in BO containing dysplastic/carcinomatous changes.
Microsatellite Instability (MSI) has been recognized as a length mutation that occurs especially in microsatellites.
Apart from Amsterdam criteria, genetic testing including microsatellite instability and mismatch repair gene mutations are required to confirm our results.
In three samples, NT44, NT45, and NT48, microsatellite instability (MSI) and LOH were simultaneously found (Figures 2 and 3).
The authors cover the pathology of the early stages and symptoms of colorectal cancer before discussing research on microsatellite instability, epigenetic silencing and cyclooxygenase-2.
Alternatively, the tumour may develop through microsatellite instability (MSI), which may be sporadic (10% of cases) or hereditary, as evident in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) (in 90% of cases).
HNPCC tumors are distinguished from other tumors by a feature know as microsatellite instability (MSI).