microsatellite instability


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microsatellite instability

An abnormality in a DNA sequence in which a microsatellite (repeating 2–6 nucleotides) found in intronic DNA is either longer or shorter than normal, which is most commonly due to defective mismatch repair.

microsatellite instability

A detectable change in the number of DNA repeat sequences that may lead to mutations in mismatch-repair genes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Immunohistochemistry versus microsatellite instability testing for screening colorectal cancer patients at risk for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome.
Sporadic colorectal cancer results from genomic instability; 85% from chromosomal instability and 15% from microsatellite instability (MSI).
Mismatch repair gene defects in sporadic colorectal cancers with microsatellite instability.
8,9) Microsatellite instability in sporadic CRC has been shown to be due to methylation of the hMLH1 gene (18) and is common in proximal tumours.
Ki-ras gene mutations, LOH of the APC and D CC genes, and microsatellite instability in primary colorectal carcinoma are not associated with micrometastases in pericolonic lymph nodes or with patients' survival.
Tumor microsatellite instability and clinical outcome in young patients with colorectal cancer.
El-Deiry and colleagues presented data suggesting that PD-1/PD-L1 protein expression is inversely associated with KRAS mutation status in patients with microsatellite instability high (MSI-H) colorectal cancer (CRC), a tumor sub-type that comprises roughly 15% of CRC cases and is characterized by higher expression of PD-1 in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes compared to non-MSI-H (abstract #152887).
Lack of or faulty MMR mechanisms can lead to increasing microsatellite instability (MSI) due to errorprone DNA replication.
Today Biocartis and VIB announced their exclusive license agreement on a novel panel of microsatellite instability (MSI) biomarkers for several cancers, in particular colorectal cancer (CRC).
Microsatellite instability markers, MLH1 and MSH2, were retained in all 7 cases (100%) tested (Figure 10, A through J).
Hirose et al (21) found a statistically significant increase in microsatellite instability.
For example, detection of widespread microsatellite instability (MSI), as demonstrated by expansion or deletion of repeat elements of DNA, may be adapted for exfoliated cells in general.