invertebrate

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invertebrate

 [in-ver´tĕ-brāt]
1. having no vertebral column.
2. any animal that has no vertebral column.

in·ver·te·brate

(in-ver'tĕ-brāt),
1. Not possessed of a spinal or vertebral column.
2. Any animal that has no spinal column.

invertebrate

/in·ver·te·brate/ (-ver´tĕ-brāt)
1. having no spinal column.
2. any animal having no spinal column.

invertebrate

(ĭn-vûr′tə-brĭt, -brāt′)
adj.
1. Lacking a backbone or spinal column; not vertebrate.
2. Of or relating to invertebrates: invertebrate zoology.
n.
An animal, such as an insect or mollusk, that lacks a backbone or spinal column.

invertebrate

[invur′təbrit]
an animal that lacks a vertebral column. Invertebrates comprise more than 95% of all species of animals.

in·ver·te·brate

(in-vĕr'tĕ-brăt)
1. Not possessed of a spinal or vertebral column.
2. (in-vĕr'tĕ-brāt) Any animal that has no spinal column.

invertebrate

any animal that does not possess a backbone.

invertebrate

1. having no vertebral column.
2. any animal that has no vertebral column.
References in periodicals archive ?
Detecting impacts and setting restoration targets in arid-zone rivers: aquatic microinvertebrate responses to reduced floodplain inundation.
When temporary wetlands flood, the previously dry floodplain teems with life as microinvertebrates and insects colonise the turbid waters, there is a pulse of nutrients, algal communities boom, waterbirds congregate in the thousands, fish populations proliferate, and aquatic macrophytes germinate.
Many microscopic biota, including algae and invertebrates, survive drying in temporary waters as resting stages (Wiggins & Mackay 1980) while some microinvertebrates are transported to floodplain wetlands with floodwaters (Jenkins & Boulton 2003).
Do microinvertebrates mostly colonise from their eggs in the dry soils, or do they also arrive with the floodwaters?
In arid zone rivers, post-flood pulses have been recorded for nutrient concentrations, microinvertebrates (>35[micro]m), macroinvertebrates (>250[micro]m), fish, waterbirds, and macrophytes.
Microinvertebrates comprise a significant proportion of the biomass in arid-zone river systems and play a critical role in their food webs (Bunn & Davies 1999).
In order to probe epiphyton and pseudoepiphyton (Sladeckova, 1962; Wetzel, 1983; Esteves, 1998; Pompeo and Mochini-Carlos, 2003) microinvertebrates from macrophytes nonsenescent vegetative structures, both methods were used.
In Western Australian fresh waters, however, this threshold is higher than that observed elsewhere, particularly among invertebrates and microinvertebrates.
Microinvertebrates associated with Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1957) (BIVALVIA, MYTILIDAE) In Rio de la Plata, Argentina.