microinequity

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microinequity

Any of the factors which frustrate equal opportunities for job promotions and career advancement, based on a person’s gender, race, age, weight or other "outsider" status. 

The term was coined by Mary Rowe of MIT for any small, everyday inequity through which individuals are often treated differently; multiple microinequities may accumulate to create more severe discrimination.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reducing microinequities would likely minimize the process of escalation that occurs when people routinely "get away with" minor types of incivility.
The kingdom has not yet come": Goping with microinequities within a Christian university.
Other terms used to describe subtle gender discriminatory events or their collective effects include chilly climate, microaggressions, microinequities, and selective incivility.
It wasn't until someone leaned over to him one day in a meeting and said, "I am so tired of her microinequities.
In a study conducted by Merck six to nine months after their employees attended one of Young's MicroInequities seminars, 90 percent of employees said they were aware of the micromessagings they send and receive; 55 percent indicated they had conversations with others at work regarding a micromessage resulting in improved work team norms, communications skills, and meeting norms; and this resulted in an 85 percent reported improvement in business relationships.
Deborah Dagit, who is our Executive Director of Diversity & Work Life, has implemented several significant processes and programs in the organization; for example, she sponsored a program called Microinequities, where employees can learn about all the ways in which we communicate powerful nonverbal messages, and how to be conscious of the messages we send, receive, and observe that impact inclusion and teamwork.
2007); microinequities (Benokraitis 1998); and selective incivility (Cortina in press).
MicroInequities have been referred to as the "invisible force" (or micro- messages) that triggers the costly, high turnover of women and people of different ethnic backgrounds, which many corporations struggle to overcome.