microexpression

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microexpression

A transient facial expression of an intense, concealed emotion, generally lasting a few tenths of a second.
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Common, universal microexpressions include a wrinkle of the nose for disgust, a corner of the mouth rising in a smirk for contempt, a furrowed brow for anger, and the corners of the mouth drooping for sadness.
gov/pubmed/16866745) tenth of a second came a busy mosaic of body language cues, facial microexpressions, and many more assessments of your dress, posture, smile, and overall demeanor.
Icelandic poet Magnus Sigurdsson captures the microexpressions of nature within his delicate lines, accruing in stanzas no less spare for the immensity of ideas contained within them.
Part II shows actual frames from the study, redrawn for anonymity, showing the microexpressions and other body language associated with different types of interactions.
He has spent four decades observing, interviewing, and videotaping couples and cataloging the multitude of microexpressions and macro-patterns that make--or break--a relationship.
American psychologist Paul Ekman's "atlas of emotions" describes over 10,000 microexpressions, and, recently, researchers from the University of Ohio published findings that reveal 21 "combination" emotions.
The Recommendation | The more accurately you can read microexpressions, the better you will know when to reassure a client, mitigate their sadness or defuse frustration or anger.
Microexpressions are fleeting expressions of concealed emotion, sometimes so fast that they happen in the blink of an eye--as fast as one-fifteenth of a second.
It's sunk $20 million into developing Future Attribute Screening Technology, a computerized version of the behavior-observation system that will use cameras to scan travelers' expressions and match them with a digital database of microexpressions.
The phrase is the tagline the German television station Vox attached to the US series Lie to Me; pop-culture punch lines of this sort are typical for Panhans and Winkler, and much as Lie to Me turns on discovering hidden truths in facial microexpressions, the artists have subtly staged scenes from the world of quotidian consumerism.
Talking with a spouse, friend or other person we know, particularly when we are face-to-face, is easier because we can pay attention to non-verbal cues, including microexpressions, those flashes of expression that are a fleeting response before they are replaced by a more socially acceptable expression.