microeconomics

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microeconomics

study of the economic behavior of individual, decision-making units, e.g. individual consumers or businesses, and the operation of individual markets. See also macroeconomics.
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This is manifested in the expansion of the institutional trend in researching enterprises within the microeconomic theory and in the development of the analysis of corporate culture within the sciences of organization and management.
The use of CBA relies on microeconomic theory and does not reach the indicators of macroeconomic performance that people care about.
This theory of how wages are determined lies at the core of standard microeconomic theory and has been verified empirically in literally hundreds of studies.
It had been reluctantly added to microeconomic theory in the wake of the Great Depression, prior to which it was universally assumed among mainstream economists that there simply were no intractable macroeconomic problems.
He is writing a book entitled Microeconomic Theory of the Family, and one of his recent papers is entitled "Youth Employment in the United States: Trends and Implications.
The concept of preference is one of the central, perhaps the central, concept in microeconomic theory.
Based on microeconomic theory and the standard model of "homo oeconomicus", women and men are assumed to behave rationally and differences in behavior are traced back to alternative constraints they are faced with.
In microeconomics, Microeconomic Theory by MasColell, Whinston, and Green (1995) was the most often used primary text, and Varian's Microeconomic Analysis (1992) was the second most often used primary text.
However, this is clearly a book of microeconomic theory.
In this microeconomic theory, the concept of the economic value in life is dynamic and predictable within the structure of the utility model.
It is part of the microeconomic theory of production, and how the relative contributions of capital and labor determine their relative use in the productive process.
In the "participation" tradition, as I have characterized it--consider Tocqueville's Democracy in America--there has existed virtually no interest in configurative patterns, strategies, zer o-sum assumptions, or microeconomic theory, although there has been measurement.