microeconomics

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microeconomics

study of the economic behavior of individual, decision-making units, e.g. individual consumers or businesses, and the operation of individual markets. See also macroeconomics.
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The hallmark of Stigler's contribution to industrial organization was the application of rigorous microeconomic theory to the analysis of real-world phenomena (Schmalensee 1987, 500).
The Microeconomic Theory of Monetary Aggregation," New Approaches to Monetary Economics: Proceedings of the Second International Symposium in Economic Theory and Econometrics, William A.
In view of the inappropriateness of the standard microeconomic theory of the firm for this particular industry, a more heuristic approach will be adopted for deriving a "model" of supply that can be applied to the time series data in this study.
Spiegel places Robbins's Essay at the end of the heyday of microeconomic theory because (1991, pp.
In this column he wrote of individual instances in which economic behavior seemed to violate traditional microeconomic theory.
John McMillan has made major contributions to the international literature on applications of modern microeconomic theory.
If the now existing microeconomic theory of incentives under asymmetric information had been available at the time, we would probably have often been more circumspect.
First, it can be considered a microeconomic theory because it employs the conceptual apparatus of "methodological individualism.
In microeconomic theory, similar observations have been made for explaining behavior that appears rational, but seems unable to adhere to the axioms and properties of classical utility theory.
This book addresses what its author calls an important omission in monetary economics, namely, the lack of a microeconomic theory of money supply under central banking.
These methods of monetary aggregation are derived from microeconomic theory, which can therefore be used to analyze the implied monetary aggregates.
The grounding of macroeconomics in microeconomic theory is also addressed by Weintraub [1979] in his book Microfoundations: The Compatibility of Microeconomics and Macroeconomics.