Michel


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Mi·chel

(mē-shel'),
M., 19th-century French physician. See: Michel malformation.

Mi·chel

(mē-shel'),
Gaston, French surgeon, 1874-1937. See: Michel spur.

Michel

named after Gaston Michel, a French surgeon (1875-1937).

Michel clip
metal skin sutures in various sizes from 8 to 16 mm long. Each clip is a 2 mm wide band of metal with a downturned sharp prong at each end. When the clip is bent double the points face each other and approximate. There is a special instrument for applying and removing the clips. They are excellent in design and concept but can be easily removed by rubbing.
Michel's trephine
a heavy-duty trephine with an adjustable head for cutting holes in bone of 0.5-0.8 mm diameter.
References in classic literature ?
As ten o'clock struck, Michel Ardan, Barbicane, and Nicholl, took leave of the numerous friends they were leaving on the earth.
And now, my dear companions," said Michel Ardan, "let us make ourselves at home; I am a domesticated man and strong in housekeeping.
While Michel Ardan was speaking, Barbicane and Nicholl were making their last preparations.
exclaimed Michel Ardan, in a good-humored tone, "much may be done in twenty-six minutes.
I hope so, Michel," replied Barbicane gently, "but I am not sure.
said Michel Ardan, "it is not easy; we are in the train, and the guard's whistle will sound before twenty-four minutes are over.
The contents of the dispatch, however, speedily became known; for the telegraphic officials possessed but little discretion, and Michel Ardan's proposition ran at once throughout the several States of the Union.
He came forward, therefore, and on silence being procured, a citizen put point-blank to him the following question: "Is the person mentioned in the telegram, under the name of Michel Ardan, on his way here?
The steamer Atlanta from Liverpool put to sea on the 2nd of October, bound for Tampa Town, having on board a Frenchman borne on the list of passengers by the name of Michel Ardan.
If ever two individuals offered a striking contrast to each other, these were certainly Michel Ardan and the Yankee Barbicane; both, moreover, being equally enterprising and daring, each in his own way.
The cries became at last so uproarious, and the popular enthusiasm assumed so personal a form, that Michel Ardan, after having shaken hands some thousands of times, at the imminent risk of leaving his fingers behind him, was fain at last to make a bolt for his cabin.
said Michel Ardan, in a tone of voice in which he would have addressed a friend of twenty years' standing.