metre

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metre

See meter.

me·ter

(mē'tĕr)
1. The fundamental unit of length in both the SI and metric system, equivalent to 39.37007874 inches. Defined to be the length of path traveled by light in a vacuum in 1/299792458 sec.
2. A device for measuring the quantity of that which passes through it.
Synonym(s): metre.
[Fr. metre; G. metron, measure]

me·ter

(m) (mē'tĕr)
1. Fundamental unit of length in the SI and metric system, equivalent to 39.37007874 inches.
2. A device for measuring the quantity of that which passes through it.
Synonym(s): metre.
[Fr. metre; G. metron, measure]

metre

see meter.

Patient discussion about metre

Q. what is the normal range for young children for their sugarI tested my grandson the other day with my meter and it read 164?

A. Of course, if you have any suspicions or worries, you may want to consult a doctor (e.g. pediatricain)

More discussions about metre
References in periodicals archive ?
What works against this is precisely the metrical form.
Embodied in metrical form and recollected by all Scots, such a national impress is in no danger of falling prey to imperial uniformity.
With the final textual metaphor of "justifying" Robinson reinforces the idea that metrical form connects to the higher law which permits continued Hope.
The reflective model, then, is a way of reading metrical forms for their mirroring of lived temporalities, allowing us access to the power and pain of contemporary modes of production.
This insistence on the primacy of metrical form contradicts not only Whitman, but Emerson.
This earlier work is an elegant effort to put literary prosody on a sound linguistic basis and yet to explain how the management of metrical forms by English poets enabled them to enhance the expressiveness of their poetry, a subject of primary concern to literary critics.
variation, using 38 metrical forms in addition to the long meter,
Instead of giving voice to "the poet's soul," poetry articulates "the countless shifting movements of the soul" in abstract metrical form, asking us to read motion as "the vibrations of emotion.
Around 1920, Jeffers began to develop a distinct prosody based on accentual meter and abandoned the metrical forms he had previously emulated.
The third chapter of Desiring Donne, "Donne's 'Irregularity': Desires Measure," gleefully sets about debunking "Platonic notions of metrical appreciation" which depend on "the readerly ability to recognize idealized or abstract metrical forms, to hold them in one's head, and then to respond to an infinitely complex interplay between those metrical ideals and textual or lexical actuality" (106).
Agonized and lonely, miserable in Irish exile yet somehow displaced even in his native land, he was also a poet of rare originality, touched with the capacity to match his soul-struggle with new and complex metrical forms and to express, strikingly and memorably, the mysterious gift of creation and man's unworthiness in the face of it.
In a sense, the notion of "linear narrative" as a supra-stanzaic organizing device is replaced with that of counterposed "themes," which "resonate" across parallel grammatical or metrical forms, such as the many puns or sabdalamkaras that in themselves evoke "battle"--even the battles of wits proper to pundits; or across concatenated images, such as the structured similes that "tell" twice the stories of lovemaking; or emerge from dialogic interplay with other "texts"--the epic source itself, obviously, but also those cultural universes of discourse that provide intellectual "content" for the epic poet--Nyaya, for example, in the debates among the characters, or the purusartha literature in re Arjuna's "right" to engage in ascetic practice.