MRSA

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MRSA

Abbreviation for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; multi-drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

MRSA

(mûr′sə)
n.
1. Any of various strains of the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus that are resistant to methicillin and other beta-lactam antibiotics and can cause life-threatening infections. Many strains are also resistant to other classes of antibiotics.
2. An infection caused by one of these strains of bacteria.

MRSA

abbreviation for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

MRSA

Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A strain of Staphylococcus aureus—a commensal which lives harmlessly on the skin and nasal cavity of about one-third of the general population—which is resistant to meticillin. Once it enters the body through a cut or abrasion, S aureus causes boils, impetigo, abscesses, and more serious infections like septicaemia and endocarditis. MRSA includes several strains of S aureus.

MRSA

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. See MARSA.

MRSA

Abbrev. for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Over 90% of hospital strains of S. aureus are penicillin-resistant-a matter for great concern as MRSA are responsible for many deaths. Initially occurring mainly in hospitals, MRSA infections with organisms carrying powerful staphylococcal toxin genes have now spread into the community and are becoming common there. These staphylococci have an acquired DNA sequence for that confers resistance to all beta-lactam antibiotics. The sequence produces an enzyme PBP2A which enables them to continue to synthesize their cell walls even if their normal penicillin-binding proteins are inactivated by meticillin. The crystal structure of PBP2A has now been established. This may be an important step in the solution of the problem.

MRSA

abbrev. methicillin-resistant STAPHYLOCOCCUS aureus. See MULTIPLE DRUG RESISTANCE.

Patient discussion about MRSA

Q. What is MRSA? I’ve heard on the news that some hospitals have a higher rate of MRSA infection. What is MRSA?

A.
MRSA - Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, is a nick name for a specific subtype of bacteria from the Staph bacteria family, which is found resistant to many of the common antibiotics that are in use today. This is due to a mutation development in the Staph bacteria, which allowed it to grow resistance against the killing ingredient in common antibiotics, therefore making it a harder infection to treat and cure. Hospitals keep track of their MRSA infections for epidemiological reasons, in order to get a perspective on bacterial resistance to antibiotics, hoping new and more effective antibiotic medication will be researched.

Q. My father was hospitalized for pneumonia. The doctors said they are afraid of HA-MRSA. Why is it so scary? My father was hospitalized for pneumonia last week. The doctors wanted to discharge him as quick as possible because they said that they are afraid of Hospital Acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA). Why is it so scary?

A. Hospital Acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of sepsis and death due to the fact that are very limited antibiotics that kill it.
Because of this it is the nightmare of doctors.
This bacteria is very durable and is very common in hospitals, and because of it, its always better to be at the hospital the minimum time needed.

Q. i just recovered from MRSA my blood pressure is very high is there a coalation between all the IV antibotics I was given the strongest antibiotics through IV and now that I'm home for a week my blood pressure is out of control

A. wow...getting MRSA is not a walk in the park...the treatment is usually with Vancomycin which is a very strong antibiotic that can cause several adverse affects. i know that it cause damage to some blood cells (white, platelets etc.) and can be toxic to the kidney. high blood pressure can indicate kidney problems. in that case you should inform your doctor IMMEDIATELY!

More discussions about MRSA
References in periodicals archive ?
Detection and eradication of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) represents a public health priority worldwide.
Community associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
Blocking the death signal from bacteria could be a way of treating painful bone infections that are resistant to antibiotics, such as those caused by Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).
Molecular epidemiology of community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Europe.