methylation

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methylation

 [meth″ĭ-la´shun]
the addition of methyl groups.

meth·yl·a·tion

(meth-i-lā'shŭn),
Addition of methyl groups; in histochemistry, used to esterify carboxyl groups and remove sulfate groups by treating tissue sections with hot methanol in the presence of hydrochloric acid, the net effect being to reduce tissue basophilia and abolish metachromasia.

methylation

[-lā′shən]
Etymology: Gk, methy, wine, hyle, matter
1 the introduction of a methyl group, CH3, to a chemical compound.
2 the addition of methyl alcohol and naphtha to ethanol to produce denatured alcohol.

methylation

Chemistry
The addition of a methyl group to a molecule.
 
Molecular biology
The addition of a methyl group to a cytosine residue on double-stranded DNA, a process which plays a major role in regulating gene expression and preventing restriction endonucleases from cutting DNA at their recognition sites.
 
Methylated genes are inactive; the pattern of methylation or imprinting is critical in gene expression, and may be passed from one generation to the next. Genes may be demethylated or methylated de novo according to the cell’s function, or during normal development. Phosphorylation is another form of semi-permanent gene control.

meth·yl·a·tion

(meth'i-lā'shŭn)
Addition of methyl groups; in histochemistry, used to esterify carboxyl groups and remove sulfate groups by treating tissue sections with hot methanol in the presence of hydrochloric acid; the net effect being to reduce tissue basophilia and abolish metachromasia.

methylation

the addition of a methyl group (-CH3) to an AMINO ACID in a PROTEIN, as in, for example, POST-TRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATION, or to a NUCLEOTIDE in a NUCLEIC ACID; see MODIFICATION AND RESTRICTION SYSTEM. See also METHYL TRANSFERASE.

methylation,

n a phase-II detoxification pathway in the liver; methyl groups combine with toxins to rid the body of various substances.

meth·yl·a·tion

(meth'i-lā'shŭn)
Addition of methyl groups; in histochemistry, used to esterify carboxyl groups and remove sulfate groups by treating tissue sections with hot methanol in the presence of hydrochloric acid.

methylation

(meth´əlā´shən),
n 1. the introduction of a methyl group, CH3, to a chemical compound.
n 2. the addition of methyl alcohol and naphtha to ethanol to produce denatured alcohol.

methylation

the addition of methyl groups.
References in periodicals archive ?
Previous studies have reported evidence of adverse effects of incomplete arsenic methylation capacity on cancer risk.
This finding suggests that arsenic methylation capacity is likely to explain partly the synergy between arsenic exposure and smoking in heart disease risk, as observed in our previous cohort analyses on CVD mortality (Chen Y et al.
The data also suggest a possible synergy between incomplete methylation and older age, and between incomplete methylation capacity and cigarette smoking, although the estimates were not precise.
Our hypothesis was that selenium would increase the methylation capacity, as shown in previous reports (Christian et al.
shRNA silencing of AS3MT expression minimizes arsenic methylation capacity of HepG2 cells.
Arsenic methylation capacity, body retention, and null genotypes of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 among current arsenic-exposed residents of Taiwan.
Abnormal methylation capacity in human liver cirrhosis.
Measures of arsenic exposure, biomarkers of exposure and methylation capacity, and GST genotypes.
III] methylation, but also other organs, especially the kidneys, have been shown to exert methylation capacity (Abernathy et al.
1998), differences in the methylation capacity could be of importance.