methane clathrate

(redirected from Methane hydrates)

methane clathrate

A potential source of clean fuel formed when methane produced by bacteria on the ocean floor dissolve and crystallise. While methane clathrate deposits are thought to represent 2–10 times the volume of natural gas, extraction with current technologies is not seen as commercially viable.
References in periodicals archive ?
8 million to further research the production of natural gas from methane hydrates, including a recommendation for the Secretary of Energy to perform a long-term methane hydrate production test in the Arctic.
Writing in the Journal of Economic Perspectives, Greenstone and coauthors Thomas Covert, assistant professor in the School of Business at the University of Chicago, and Christopher Knittel, professor of energy economics and director of the Center for Energy & Environmental Policy Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, maintain that the continued use of fossil fuels will increase global temperatures by 10[degrees]-15[degrees]F--and those numbers do not account for advances in fossil fuel extraction techniques that could make resources we cannot even extract today economically accessible, such as oil shale and methane hydrates, potentially adding another 1.
Thus fluctuations in time in both pressure and temperature will systematically remove pure methane hydrates in favour of hydrates which become progressively more enriched in ethane - the survival of the fittest scenario.
Substantial deposits of methane hydrates in Japan and South Korea have been confirmed, with both investigating how they could be safely and economically developed.
On the seafloor, warmer ocean temperatures threaten to thaw solid deposits of methane hydrates and release methane gas into seawater.
Methane hydrates have recently become the focus of efforts by India, Japan and Korea to develop as a source of future energy.
A federal study in 2008 suggests that the energy potential in methane hydrates may exceed that of all other fossil fuels.
As part of the government's methane hydrates research and development program, which has been underway since 2001, the ministry has conducted production tests.
South Korea joins other economies in East Asia - Japan, China and Taiwan - in the search for methane hydrates and the increasing research into its potential for commercial production.
Estimates suggest that there is about the same amount of carbon in methane hydrates as there is in every other organic carbon store on the planet.
The most widely accepted hypothesis suggests that it was due to the destabilising of methane hydrates that remained frozen on ocean floors.
After this technological breakthrough, Japan had announced it had extracted natural gas at a depth of 1,000 meters from methane hydrates.