Metchnikoff theory


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Metchnikoff theory

 [mech´nĭ-kof]
the theory that bacteria and other harmful elements in the body are attacked and destroyed by cells called phagocytes, and that the contest between such harmful elements and the phagocytes produces inflammation. Named for Elie Metchnikoff (1845–1916), Russian zoologist in Paris and winner, with Ehrlich, of the Nobel prize for medicine and physiology in 1908.

Metch·ni·koff the·o·ry

(mech'nĭ-kof),
the phagocytic theory, that the body is protected against infection by the leukocytes and other cells that engulf and destroy the invading microorganisms.

Metch·ni·koff the·o·ry

(mech'ni-kof thē'ŏr-ē)
The phagocytic theory, according to which the body is protected against infection by the leukocytes and other cells that engulf and destroy the invading microorganisms.

Metchnikoff,

Elie, Russian biologist in France and Nobel laureate, 1845-1916.
Metchnikoff theory - the body is protected against infection by leukocytes and other cells.