metastasis

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metastasis

 [mĕ-tas´tah-sis]
1. the transfer of disease from one organ or part to another not directly connected with it. It may be due either to the transfer of pathogenic microorganisms (e.g., tubercle bacilli) or to the transfer of cells, as in malignant tumors. See also cancer.
2. a growth of pathogenic microorganisms or of abnormal cells distant from the site primarily involved by the morbid process. adj., adj metastat´ic.
Metastasis: A metastatic cascade occurs in several steps, marked 1 through 7. From Damjanov, 2000.

me·tas·ta·sis

, pl.

me·tas·ta·ses

(mĕ-tas'tă-sis, -sēz),
1. The shifting of a disease or its local manifestations, from one part of the body to another, as in mumps when the symptoms referable to the parotid gland subside and the testis becomes affected.
2. The spread of a disease process from one part of the body to another, as in the appearance of neoplasms in parts of the body remote from the site of the primary tumor; results from dissemination of tumor cells by the lymphatics or blood vessels or by direct extension through serous cavities or subarachnoid or other spaces.
3. Transportation of bacteria from one part of the body to another, through the bloodstream (hematogenous metastasis) or through lymph channels (lymphogenous metastasis).
Synonym(s): secondaries (1)
[G. a removing, fr. meta, in the midst of, + stasis, a placing]

metastasis

/me·tas·ta·sis/ (mĕ-tas´tah-sis) pl. metas´tases  
1. transfer of disease from one organ or part of the body to another not directly connected with it, due either to transfer of pathogenic microorganisms or to transfer of cells; all malignant tumors are capable of metastasizing.
2. a growth of pathogenic microorganisms or of abnormal cells distant from the site primarily involved by the morbid process.metastat´ic

metastasis

(mĭ-tăs′tə-sĭs)
n. pl. metasta·ses (-sēz′) Medicine
1. Transmission of pathogenic microorganisms or cancerous cells from an original site to one or more sites elsewhere in the body, usually by way of the blood vessels or lymphatics.
2. A secondary cancerous growth formed by transmission of cancerous cells from a primary growth located elsewhere in the body.

met′a·stat′ic (mĕt′ə-stăt′ĭk) adj.
met′a·stat′i·cal·ly adv.

metastasis

[mətas′təsis] pl. metastases
Etymology: Gk, meta + stasis, standing
1 an active process by which tumor cells move from the primary location of a cancer by severing connections from the original cell group and establishing remote colonies. Because malignant tumors have no enclosing capsule, cells may escape, become emboli, and be transported by the lymphatic circulation or the bloodstream to implant in lymph nodes and other organs far from the primary tumor.
2 a tumor that develops away from the site of origin. Compare anaplasia. metastasize, v., metastatic, adj.
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Modes of metastasis of cancer

metastasis

Plural, metastases Oncology The distal spread of a malignancy, either by penetration of a blood or lymphatic vessel or by spread along a serosal membrane with later development into a 2nd focus of malignancy. See Blow-out metastasis, Cannonball metastasis, Micrometastasis, Skip metastasis.

me·tas·ta·sis

, pl. metastases (mĕ-tas'tă-sis, -sēz)
1. The shifting of a disease or its local manifestations, from one part of the body to another, as in mumps when the symptoms referable to the parotid gland subside and the testis becomes affected.
2. The spread of a disease process from one part of the body to another, as in the appearance of neoplasms in parts of the body remote from the site of the primary tumor; results from dissemination of tumor cells by the lymphatics or blood vessels or by direct extension through serous cavities or subarachnoid or other spaces.
3. Transportation of bacteria from one part of the body to another, through the bloodstream (hematogenous metastasis) or through lymph channels (lymphogenous metastasis).

metastasis

(mĕ-tăs′tă-sis) plural.metastases [″ + stasis, stand]
1. Movement of bacteria or body cells (esp. cancer cells) from one part of the body to another.
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METASTASES: CT scan of liver (upper left) with round metastatic tumors (Courtesy of Harvey Hatch, MD, Curry General Hospital)
2. Change in location of a disease or of its manifestations or transfer from one organ or part to another not directly connected. See: illustration

The usual application is to the manifestation of a malignancy as a secondary growth arising from the primary growth in a new location. The malignant cells may spread through the lymphatic circulation, the bloodstream, or avenues such as the cerebrospinal fluid.

metastatic (mĕt″ă-stăt′ĭk), adjective

metastasis

1. The spread or transfer of any disease, but especially cancer, from its original site to another place in the body where the disease process starts up. Metastasis usually occurs by way of the bloodstream or the lymphatic system or, in the case of lung disease by coughing and re-inhalation of particles to other parts of the lung.
2. The new focus of disease, so produced.

metastasis

the process of cancerous tissue spreading to various parts of the body.

Metastasis (plural, metastases)

The spread of disease from one part of the body to another, as when cancer cells appear in parts of the body remote from the site of the primary tumor.

metastasis (m·tasˑ·t·sis),

n growth and movement of cancer cells from one area of the body to another.

me·tas·ta·sis

, pl. metastases (mĕ-tas'tă-sis, -sēz)
1. Spread of a disease process from one part of the body to another, as in the appearance of neoplasms in parts of the body remote from the site of the primary tumor; results from dissemination of tumor cells by the lymphatics or blood vessels or by direct extension through serous cavities or subarachnoid or other spaces.
2. Transportation of bacteria from one part of the body to another, through the bloodstream or through lymph channels.

metastasis (mətas´təsis),

n the transfer of a disease by blood vessels, lymph vessels, or the respiratory tract (through aspiration) from one organ or region to another not directly contiguous with it. Usually used in reference to malignant tumor cells, but bacteria can also metastasize (e.g., in focal infection).

metastasis

pl. metastases [Gr.]
1. the transfer of disease from one organ or part to another not directly connected with it. It may be due either to the transfer of pathogenic microorganisms (e.g. tubercle bacilli) or to the transfer of cells, as in malignant tumors.
2. metastases, growths of pathogenic microorganisms or of abnormal cells distant from the site primarily involved by the morbid process.
See also cancer.

Patient discussion about metastasis

Q. I have met my close friend after 3 years. She is showing some signs of high depression. How can I help her? I have met my very close friend after 3 years and she is very depressed. I am worried that she is showing some signs of high depression. She talks all rubbish and negatives these days which is filled with that nonsense hopelessness. She was fine and going good when I left her and now she is completely negative in her behavior and also very depressed. She is not able to enjoy my company. She had lost her weight and her eyes reflect the bluntness. She keeps silent most of the time. How can I help her?

A. I think first you must talk to her and find out about when and how this started. Take her to all the places where you both used to go. She might have come across difficult phase in these years which would have made her depressed and she may need a support to bring her back to normal way of living. We cannot say that this is a depression which would get cured by just talking and knowing the reasons but you must help her to fight back for the thing she had lost. If there is no desired result, then do consult a physician.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9QxddJOQY4&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/vP9QxddJOQY4_nervous_system_depression_psyche?q=depression&feature=player_embedded

Q. Does staging in breast cancer is linked to metastasis and what is the use of staging?

A. stages in cancer tell of it's progress. is it benign, does it have a capsule, did it metastasized and all that. but if you are looking for more accurate and more information on that in general:
http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/diagnosis/staging.jsp

this should do it!

Q. What is the best pathophysiology of colorectal cancer. The pathophysiology just has to be brief and concise. It also has to include nursing considerations for the patient.

A. i'm not sure i understand your question...do you mean what is the best treatment for colorectal cancer? patophysiology is the changes the tissue acquired. if you'll give me more details on what you are looking for i'll be more then happy to help you.

More discussions about metastasis
References in periodicals archive ?
3 Bone Metastases Therapeutics: Market Characterization 17
For each patient, we collected information on baseline characteristics, such as age, sex, date of nephrectomy, prognostic class based on the Heng criteria, (14) and site of metastases at the beginning of the third-line treatment.
In Table III, details of the sites of bone and other metastases, modalities used to demonstrate bony metastases, complications of disease, and patients, progress are shown.
The 2 cases presented here demonstrate extensive spinal canal drop metastases, occupying almost the entire canal from the craniocervical junction down to the lumbosacral spine.
In patients with initially unresectable metastases, one of the challenges is to downsize the metastases so that they become resectable.
Reports from two phase II studies of denosumab for treating patients with bone metastases from solid tumors showed that the drug was at least as effective as an intravenous bisphosphonate for reducing a plasma marker of bone resorption.
It can detect occult metastases in about 10-20% of cases of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC)[9-11].
6% of the patients in the treatment group developed symptomatic brain metastases compared with 40.
Cutaneous metastases from carcinoma are relatively uncommon in clinical practice, but it is very important that they are recognized since the appearance of cutaneous metastases signals widespread metastatic disease, resulting in a poor prognosis.
Scientists today don't hold that cancer cells are dispersed randomly throughout the body, so that only growth conditions in different organs determine the distribution of metastases.
The diagnostic accuracy of TPS and TPA was investigated for any CNS metastases, parenchymal brain metastases, and for leptomeningeal carcinomatosis.
There is a need for effective drugs for patients with cancer metastases in the brain," said Stephen M.