metacognition

(redirected from Metacognitive strategies)
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metacognition

 [met″ah-kog-nish´un]
an educational process that incorporates knowledge about one's abilities, the demands of given tasks, and potentially effective learning strategies; it involves self-regulation via planning, predicting, monitoring, regulating, evaluating, and revising strategies.

metacognition

A form of critical thinking, which is a key criterion for acquiring and assessing new information. For scientific thought, metacognition entails awareness of one’s background knowledge, assumptions, and auxiliary hypotheses regarding how an observation occurs and in assessing its validity.

metacognition

(met-a-kog-nish'un) plural.metacognitions
Awareness of the knowledge one possesses and one's ability to apply that knowledge.
See: insight

metacognition

knowledge of one's own mental processes. Sometimes applied to the self-regulation of cognitive processes, such as in the application of mental skills.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) is an internationally recognized survey instrument that measures motivational beliefs, cognitive and metacognitive strategies, and self-regulated learning strategies (Duncan & McKeachie, 2005).
Interestingly though, Moss found that 20% of mothers in her research verbalized and modeled metacognitive strategies when their children were as young as 24 months old, suggesting that some mothers of even very young children may engage in scaffolding metacognitive thinking.
It is interactive because it involves hypertext links through which browsing take place; it is strategic because surfers have information to find that orients their choice of links and they use different cognitive and metacognitive strategies and skills while they are following a path; it is adaptable since surfers change their strategies according to the design characteristics of different content structures.
Both teachers and students demonstrated improved ability to effectively use metacognitive strategies in their teaching and learning.
In addition to assessing these processes, analyzing the metacognitive strategies that children use in learning situations seems important for an analysis of school performance in early childhood.
Given the importance of teaching metacognitive strategies to students with LD (Gersten et al.
Engage the attention of struggling readers with memorable, creative, and often whimsical metacognitive strategies and activities
Interestingly/surprisingly and contrary to claims maintained in literature relating strategy use to proficiency level the present findings show that beginners use not only few strategies in general but also few metacognitive strategies (in fact, only one) than more advanced students do (cf.
When dealing with memory deficits, students with ADHD are unable to hold the directions for simple metacognitive strategies in their memory long enough to practice them (Borkowski et al.
Metacognitive strategies make learning relevant and more engaging for students and teachers.
This will also mean encouraging students to use metacognitive strategies to explore their own ideas on the nature of mathematics.
In support of Ellis's (1997) findings, Maimon (2001) demonstrated benefits of culturally based metacognitive strategies for improving the writing skills of students from a non-English speaking background.