metacognition

(redirected from Metacognitive)
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Related to Metacognitive: Metacognitive strategies

metacognition

 [met″ah-kog-nish´un]
an educational process that incorporates knowledge about one's abilities, the demands of given tasks, and potentially effective learning strategies; it involves self-regulation via planning, predicting, monitoring, regulating, evaluating, and revising strategies.

metacognition

A form of critical thinking, which is a key criterion for acquiring and assessing new information. For scientific thought, metacognition entails awareness of one’s background knowledge, assumptions, and auxiliary hypotheses regarding how an observation occurs and in assessing its validity.

metacognition

(met-a-kog-nish'un) plural.metacognitions
Awareness of the knowledge one possesses and one's ability to apply that knowledge.
See: insight
References in periodicals archive ?
If we define complexity in terms of metacognitive thinking, then reading less fiction on the grade- and high-school levels will decrease students' capacity for complex thinking in all academic disciplines.
Schraw and Dennison (1994) posed the creation of an instrument to measure metacognitive awareness in adults and adolescents that would be easy to apply.
Metacognitive knowledge refers to acquired knowledge about cognitive processes, knowledge that can be used to control cognitive processes.
To demonstrate the importance of metacognitive awareness in learning academic subjects, Lemons (1994) examines students' biology reading comprehension and metacognition to identify effective correlates of success in college anatomy and physiology.
Metacognitive scaffolding favor conscientious planning, monitoring, self-evaluation, and control of cognitive processes during learning task development in computational environments (Kim & Hannafin, 2011; Molenaar et al.
Conclusions: According to these findings, current interventions for addiction should focus more specifically on improving metacognitive Mastery.
During his time, Flavell (1979) identified the metacognitive process and described it with the transitive and self-reflective meaning of the verb to think, defining this process as "thinking about thinking".
Metacognition also thinks about one's own thoughts process such as skills needed in acamedics, memory and the ability to scrutinize learning Metacognitive knowledge is about our own cognitive processes and our consideration of how to control those processes to maximize learning.
Integrating reflection into a writing course is one way to enhance students' metacognition and metacognitive awareness as reflection provides writers an opportunity to become a critic of their writing experiences.
It is harder to tackle affective and metacognitive learning, because they rely on self-reflection, which may be challenging for students who are used to following specific instructions to complete assignments.
17 The use of metacognitive strategies at high frequency reveals that managing and organising their language learning is more important for the students than any other thing.