metacognition


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metacognition

 [met″ah-kog-nish´un]
an educational process that incorporates knowledge about one's abilities, the demands of given tasks, and potentially effective learning strategies; it involves self-regulation via planning, predicting, monitoring, regulating, evaluating, and revising strategies.

metacognition

A form of critical thinking, which is a key criterion for acquiring and assessing new information. For scientific thought, metacognition entails awareness of one’s background knowledge, assumptions, and auxiliary hypotheses regarding how an observation occurs and in assessing its validity.

metacognition

(met-a-kog-nish'un) plural.metacognitions
Awareness of the knowledge one possesses and one's ability to apply that knowledge.
See: insight

metacognition

knowledge of one's own mental processes. Sometimes applied to the self-regulation of cognitive processes, such as in the application of mental skills.
References in periodicals archive ?
Knowing when, where, and how to remember: A problem of metacognition.
The differences in volumes in the anterior prefrontal cortex between lucid dreamers and non-lucid dreamers suggest that lucid dreaming and metacognition are indeed closely connected.
The temporal precedence of metacognition in the development of anxiety and depression symptoms in the context of life-stress: A prospective study.
The MSU Honors Program is not alone in embracing metacognition as a key practice.
o6]: There is no statistically significant difference in metacognitive awareness between fifth grade students who receive CSR instruction three times per week compared to students who do not receive CSR instruction while controlling for student level of metacognition.
Singapore Math framework's five pillars, which consist of concepts, skills, processes, attitudes and metacognition closely resemble the eight standards for mathematical practices in Common Core.
7) Leaders can develop metacognition by reflecting back and assessing past experiences shortly after they occur.
Students need productive engagement with these texts, so motivation and metacognition also contribute, as do forms of teacher guidance for students and support for their families likely enhance the effectiveness of this engagement.
It begins with an introduction to the concept of updating mathematical education and introductions to Schoenfeld and Torner, followed by articles on metacognition, including developing problem-solving skills in elementary school, transmissive and constructivist beliefs of mathematics teachers and university students, and on Schoenfeld's studies of social metacognitive control.
As Rowlands explains: "The appeal to metacognition attempts to explain the normativity of our emotions by way of our control over them.
As metacognition plays a vital role in successful learning, it is important to study metacognitive activity and development to determine how students can be taught to better apply their cognitive resources through metacognitive control.