meta-analysis

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meta-analysis

 [met″ah-ah-nal´ĭ-sis]
any systematic method that uses statistical analysis to integrate the data from a number of independent studies.

meta-analysis

/meta-anal·y·sis/ (met″ah-ah-nal´ĭ-sis) a systematic method that takes data from a number of independent studies and integrates them using statistical analysis.

meta-analysis

a systematic method of evaluating statistical data based on results of several independent studies of the same problem.

meta analysis

A method that uses statistical techniques to combine results from different studies and obtain a quantitative estimate of the overall effect of a particular intervention or variable on a defined outcome—i.e., it is a statistical process for pooling data from many clinical trials to glean a clear answer. Meta-analysis produces a stronger conclusion than can be provided by any individual study.

Cons
Bias, potential for analytical sloppiness, lack of understanding of basic issues, failure to consider major covariates, and overstating the strengths and precision of the results.

meta-analysis

Data synthesis, quantitative overview Data analysis A systematic method that uses statistical techniques for combining results from different studies to obtain a quantitative estimate of the overall effect of a particular intervention or variable on a defined outcome; MA produces a stronger conclusion than can be provided by any individual study. See Cochran Collaboration, Cumulative meta-analysis.

meta-analysis

An attempt to improve the reliability of the findings of medical research by combining and analyzing the results of all discoverable trials on the same subject. In crude terms the advantages are obvious: trials that find against a hypothesis will cancel out the effect of those that find for it. Pooling of raw data is not, however, without statistical hazard and it has become apparent that meta-analysis can introduce its own sources of inaccuracy. The method is currently undergoing refinement.

meta-analysis

post-hoc statistical or trends analysis of data; i.e. analyisis of aggregated data from disparate experiments with similar research protocols
References in periodicals archive ?
This yields more reliable estimates of treatment effect compared to traditional meta-analyses based on published group means.
The network meta-analysis provides a hierarchy of effects due to the use of different pain killers, based on VAS pain score during HSG and VAS pain score at 30 minutes or more after HSG, which has advantages in the comparison with traditional pairwise meta-analyses.
Meta-analyses are sometimes included as part of a systematic review (but not necessarily).
Although meta-analyses have been increasingly used to summarize evidence and update readers on specific topics, their reporting quality varies significantly.
Eight of nine meta-analyses synthesizing the effect of garlic on blood lipids reported significantly decreased total cholesterol levels.
To improve the quality of reporting meta-analyses, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement was published in 2009.
The results mentioned above are the product of some of the difficulties that researchers embarking on systematic reviews and meta-analyses, in which an insufficient number of studies are found, have to face.
Of the 70 RCTs that were included, EPA+DHA supplementation reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the meta-analyses of all studies combined when compared with placebo.
This meta-meta-analysis also included three meta-analyses of comparative trials of beta-blockers versus diuretics and three meta-analyses of beta-blockers compared with other drugs.
Meta-analyses of the 119,428 births to women in the combined sample found that exposure to such interventions was associated with lower odds of maternal and neonatal mortality (odds ratios, 0.
The authors of a commentary article discuss the pros and cons of meta-analyses.
This is a good example of how inclusion criteria, subsequently published clinical trials, and the choice of statistical methods can lead to conflicting conclusions from meta-analyses on the same topic.