meta-analysis

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meta-analysis

 [met″ah-ah-nal´ĭ-sis]
any systematic method that uses statistical analysis to integrate the data from a number of independent studies.

meta-analysis

/meta-anal·y·sis/ (met″ah-ah-nal´ĭ-sis) a systematic method that takes data from a number of independent studies and integrates them using statistical analysis.

meta-analysis

a systematic method of evaluating statistical data based on results of several independent studies of the same problem.

meta analysis

A method that uses statistical techniques to combine results from different studies and obtain a quantitative estimate of the overall effect of a particular intervention or variable on a defined outcome—i.e., it is a statistical process for pooling data from many clinical trials to glean a clear answer. Meta-analysis produces a stronger conclusion than can be provided by any individual study.

Cons
Bias, potential for analytical sloppiness, lack of understanding of basic issues, failure to consider major covariates, and overstating the strengths and precision of the results.

meta-analysis

Data synthesis, quantitative overview Data analysis A systematic method that uses statistical techniques for combining results from different studies to obtain a quantitative estimate of the overall effect of a particular intervention or variable on a defined outcome; MA produces a stronger conclusion than can be provided by any individual study. See Cochran Collaboration, Cumulative meta-analysis.

meta-analysis

An attempt to improve the reliability of the findings of medical research by combining and analyzing the results of all discoverable trials on the same subject. In crude terms the advantages are obvious: trials that find against a hypothesis will cancel out the effect of those that find for it. Pooling of raw data is not, however, without statistical hazard and it has become apparent that meta-analysis can introduce its own sources of inaccuracy. The method is currently undergoing refinement.

meta-analysis

post-hoc statistical or trends analysis of data; i.e. analyisis of aggregated data from disparate experiments with similar research protocols
References in periodicals archive ?
As meta-analyses allow for the pooling of data when studies are sufficiently similar in design and endpoint, they enable interpretation and observation of effect across a greater population.
What's more, multiple meta-analyses of the same primary evidence often reach contradictory conclusions regarding the same hypothesis.
Editor's Note: Authors Haifa Maalmi and colleagues note, "The rather consistent results found in our meta-analyses suggest vitamin D supplementation might bear a potential to improve prognosis among colorectal and breast cancer patients, a suggestion that should be followed up and tested in randomized controlled trials.
Of the 70 RCTs that were included, EPA+DHA supplementation reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the meta-analyses of all studies combined when compared with placebo.
In addition, the authors report on three meta-analyses that unfortunately did not identify half of the total number of randomised controlled trials, while some included data of unclear validity.
In general, during the last two decades meta-analyses have become more widely used in epidemiology, and the 2006 amendment of the IARC Preamble now specifically mentions the possibility of premeeting and ad hoc meta-analyses during the course of a Monograph meeting (IARC 2006).
As a consequence, the appearance of the SROC plot as a graphic summary in meta-analyses of CSDTs is strikingly different than the forest plots used as graphic summaries in meta-analyses of RCTs.
In meta-analyses of 3 placebo-controlled trials, calcium and vitamin D increased the risk of myocardial infarction (relative risk 1.
A report on two meta-analyses of stage II and III operable non-small cell lung cancers treated with surgery with or without chemotherapy reported that postoperative chemotherapy improved the five-year survival rate, recurrence-free survival time to localized recurrence, and time to distant recurrence.
Woolcott and his colleagues updated the results of two previous meta-analyses conducted by Dr.
The new meta-analysis, like meta-analyses in general, gave more mathematical weight to studies with larger samples, Caspi and Moffitt note.