messenger RNA

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RNA

 
messenger RNA (mRNA) see ribonucleic acid.
ribosomal RNA (rRNA) see ribonucleic acid.
transfer RNA (tRNA) see ribonucleic acid.

mes·sen·ger RNA (mRNA),

(mes'en-jĕr),
the RNA reflecting the exact nucleoside sequence of the genetically active DNA and carrying the "message" of the latter, coded in its sequence, to the cytoplasmic areas where protein is made in amino acid sequences specified by the mRNA, and hence primarily by the DNA; viral RNAs are considered to be natural messenger RNAs.

messenger RNA

n. Abbr. mRNA
The form of RNA that mediates the transfer of genetic information from the cell nucleus to ribosomes in the cytoplasm, where it serves as a template for protein synthesis. It is synthesized from a DNA template during the process of transcription.

messenger RNA (mRNA)

[mes′ənjər]
Etymology: ME, messangere, message bearer; RNA, ribonucleic acid
(in molecular genetics) an RNA fraction that carries information from deoxyribonucleic acid to the protein-synthesizing ribosomes of cells. mRNA contains codons that are eventually encoded into amino acids via the translation process.

messenger RNA

An RNA (ribonucleic acid) molecule which has coding regions and translation signals derived from a gene, carries the reverse template message from DNA, and is required for protein synthesis. mRNA is a nucleic acid intermediate that specifies the amino acid sequence of a polypeptide during translation. Under most circumstances, and in accordance with the so-called central dogma of biology, the message flows from DNA to RNA, which is then translated into protein. DNA is wrapped around proteins (histones in chromatin); the DNA then unwinds, allowing transcription by one of the three RNA polymerases, forming a primary (nuclear) RNA transcript that is then processed to remove the intervening RNA sequences (introns), yielding a mature mRNA molecule. The mature mRNA then passes through nuclear pores into the cytoplasm, where translation into proteins occurs. When a particular mRNA is no longer needed, it is degraded by ribonucleases.

mes·sen·ger RNA

(mRNA) (mes'ĕn-jĕr)
The RNA reflecting the exact nucleoside sequence of the genetically active DNA and carrying the "message" of the latter, coded in its sequence, to the cytoplasmic areas where protein is made in amino acid sequences specified by the mRNA, and hence primarily by the DNA; viral RNA is considered to be natural messenger RNA.

messenger RNA

Commonly written as mRNA, this is the molecule that reads the genetic code from DNA. Before this can happen the double helix must separate into two single strands. One of these carries the same sequence as the mRNA and is called the coding strand. The other is called the template, or antisense, strand and it is this strand that directs the synthesis of the mRNA by complementary base pairing. In RNA the base uracil replaces thymine. The messenger RNA molecule then leaves the cell nucleus and passes out through a nuclear membrane pore to the site of protein synthesis. There the appropriate amino acids are selected and placed in the right order by TRANSFER RNA which, using its anticodons, reads the code on the messenger RNA.

messenger RNA (mRNA)

a single stranded type of POLYNUCLEOTIDE molecule that comprises a sequence of ribonucleotides with the bases ADENINE, GUANINE, CYTOSINE and URACIL. mRNA is transcribed (see TRANSCRIPTION from the DNA and contains the sequence of instructions from which a PROTEIN is translated (see TRANSLATION by the action of RIBOSOMES.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results of a Phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation study evaluating the safety and tolerability of EZN-3042, a survivin messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) antagonist, administered with or without docetaxel in adult patients with advanced solid tumors or lymphoma," Anthony W.
Molecular diagnosis of residual and recurrent thyroid cancer by amplification of thyroglobulin messenger ribonucleic acid in peripheral blood.
Ribozymes are enzymes that can target and cleave messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) thereby interrupting replication and gene transcription to prevent production of the gene product.