merozoite

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Related to Merozoites: sporozoite, schizonts, Gametocytes

merozoite

 [mer″o-zo´īt]
one of the organisms formed by multiple fission (schizogony) of a sporozoite within the body of the host.

mer·o·zo·ite

(mer'ō-zō'īt),
The motile infective stage of sporozoan protozoa that results from schizogony or a similar type of asexual reproduction; for example, endodyogeny or endopolygeny. Merozoites form at the surface of schizonts, blastophores, or invaginations into schizonts, and are responsible for the vast reproductive powers of sporozoan parasites; this is seen in human malaria, where the cyclic production of merozoites produces the typical fever and chill syndrome.
Synonym(s): endodyocyte (2)
[mero- + G. zōon, animal]

merozoite

/mero·zo·ite/ (mer″o-zo´īt) one of the organisms formed by multiple fission (schizogony) of a sporozoite within the body of the host.

merozoite

(mĕr′ə-zō′īt)
n.
Any of the cells of an apicomplexan parasite that arise following multiple asexual fission and may enter either the asexual or sexual phase of the life cycle.

merozoite

[mer′əzō′īt]
Etymology: Gk, meros + zoon, animal
an organism produced from segmentation of a schizont during the asexual reproductive phase of the life cycle of a sporozoon, specifically the malarial parasite Plasmodium. Merozoites can either continue the asexual phase of the life cycle by developing into trophozoites and repeating the process of schizogony or differentiate into male and female gametes and enter the sexual stage. See also Plasmodium.

merozoite

A motile, pre- and extra-erythrocytic form of a sporozoan (e.g., plasmodia), resulting from the asexual division of a schizont during shizogony, which in Plasmodium spp occurs in the liver or red cells. Merozoites either infect other red cells or spontaneously develop into sexual forms—i.e., microgametes (male forms) or macrogametes (female forms).

mer·o·zo·ite

(mer'ŏ-zō'īt)
The motile infective stage of sporozoan protozoa that results from schizogony or a similar type of asexual reproduction; responsible for the vast reproductive powers of sporozoan parasites.
[mero- + G. zōon, animal]

merozoite

One of the stages in the life cycle of the malarial parasite. Merozoites are small motile bodies released in large numbers after asexual division of the schizont in red blood cells. They invade further red cells or liver cells where they continue to reproduce asexually or initiate a sexual reproduction cycle by the formation of male and female sex cells.

merozoite

one of the organisms formed by multiple fission (schizogony) of a sporozoite within the body of the host.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fragments of the polymorphic Mr 185,000 glycoprotein from the surface of isolated Plasmodium falciparum merozoite form an antigenic complex.
INSIDE LIVER CELLS Sporozoites change into a form called schizonts, which grow and divide into thousands of merozoites.
Inter-allelic recombination in the Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 gene among Indian and Colombian isolates.
Identification of surface and integral antigens from spontaneously released Plasmodium falciparum merozoites by radioionidation and metabolic labeling, Z.
In the red blood cells, the trophozoites invade the host's red blood cells and multiply asexually by binary fission producing merozoites.
When the erythrocyte bursts, merozoites are released; some of these develop into male and female gametocytes, which a biting mosquito then can ingest and the cycle is continued within the mosquito's body.
Within the red blood cells, the merozoites go through another cycle of asexual reproduction, after which the cells burst and release millions of additional merozoites, which invade yet more red blood cells.
Tissue samples of the opossum (Dideiphis virginiana), raccoon (Procyon lotor), hispid cot ton rat (Sigmodon hispidus), deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), and the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogastor) were examined microscopically for merozoites and/or sarcocysts.
The sporozoites travel to the person's liver, infecting cells and dividing to produce thousands of merozoites, the second stage.
The parasites then multiply in the bloodstream, forming tiny pear- or ring-shaped bodies, called merozoites, that invade the red cells.