psychological abuse

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psychological abuse

Emotional abuse, mental abuse A form of mistreatment in which there is intent to cause mental or emotional pain or injury; PA includes verbal aggression, statements intended to humiliate or infantilize, insults, threats of abandonment or institutionalization; PA results in stress, social withdrawal, long-term or recalcitrant depression, anxiety
References in periodicals archive ?
9) Scarry implies that critics talk less about physical than mental cruelty and that novelists write more about mental than physical torture because "physical pain--unlike any other state of consciousness--has no referential content" (p.
Documentation requirements for claims of extreme mental cruelty are more stringent.
Doris Keningale became an executive officer in the Civil Service but the marriage began to fail and her husband turned to mental cruelty by constantly abusing her.
Now we are threatened with the mental cruelty of a general election devoted to time-wasting opposing political arguments about the issue of fox hunting.
Of the figure of 59 youngsters believed to be in danger, 20 were registered under the category of neglect and another 11 were believed to be at risk of emotional abuse or mental cruelty.
The insecurity and physical and mental cruelty experienced by many children who have no one of their own to whom they can turn, is a situation of which we should all be ashamed.
And refusing them books and mags is sheer mental cruelty.
Melanie told police that she had been attacked and had previously been forced to endure mental cruelty from the towering skinhead.
Siekkinen's stories, then, are not merely expressive of emotional and mental cruelty between men and women, as has been suggested.
Widespread expectations of love in marriage even translated into middle-class family law, as mental cruelty suits assumed some willingness on the part of good husbands to express affection for their wives; unloving husbands were defying agreed-upon middle-class norms and could be punished by divorce.
That, at a time they need help and compassion the most, it's denied them, if not with physical cruelty, then with mental cruelty.